Native plants and modern garden furnishings at Redenta’s Garden Arlington


Whew! I just got home from a whirlwind trip to New York City to visit public gardens, and does Austin ever feel blissfully small and non-crowded in comparison to Manhattan. The High Line was the highlight, and I’ll have pictures for you soon. But first I’ve been wanting to share my recent visit to Redenta’s Garden in Arlington, between Dallas and Fort Worth.


This is the second Redenta’s location I’ve visited. The first was Redenta’s smaller Dallas shop and urban nursery, which carries contemporary pots and accessories that reminded me somewhat of West Coast garden shops I’ve visited.


Both locations have a hip potting bar where you can plant up containers with succulents and cactus.


Fermob bistro sets and other colorful, contemporary garden seating can be found here as well.


I imagine tender succulents are tucked in the greenhouse in the winter, but on this October visit it was open to refreshing breezes.


In addition to contemporary style, Redenta’s is known for its native plant selection, and that’s what the suburban Arlington location really offers: room for more plants.


While Redenta’s isn’t as big as Austin’s Barton Springs Nursery, not to mention The Natural Gardener, it does have a nice selection of drought-tolerant beauties like hesperaloe with yellow bloom spikes as well as the standard coral-pink. I think I see some red ‘Brakelights’ in there too.


The yellow hesperaloe echoes the color of a classic motel chair sitting by a silver Airstream camper in the display yard. I could tell this area is usually a focal point of the grounds, with seating and pots on an urbanite (recycled concrete) patio, shaded by a striped awning. But we visited the day after a strong windstorm had hit the Dallas area, and the nursery was still picking up after the damaging winds.


Yucca rostrata shadows and a succulent “R” for Redenta’s add punch to this vignette.


At the other end of the yard, more seating is grouped around a metal-ring fire pit, surrounded by pots of agave, yucca, and prickly pear.


This is very “Austin,” don’t you think?


The Yucca rostrata were tempting, but how would I get one home? Instead I was drawn to the display of Hover Dishes on the front porch. I haven’t found these for sale anywhere in Austin (although I’ve ordered one directly from the Vancouver manufacturer, Pot Inc.), but Redenta’s had a great selection.


I selected the orange Dolga pot, and my DH gave it to me for my birthday, which just happened to be that day. Perfect timing for a visit, eh? I’m going to hold onto it over the winter and plant it up with succulents in the spring. Or maybe I’ll fill it with pumpkins and hang it right now!


Inside the shop, Redenta’s has more containers and garden accessories…


…including a selection of Steel Life containers, which are also hard to find at Austin nurseries.


Overall I like the Dallas Redenta’s better for their garden-shop offerings, but the Arlington location has a bigger plant selection and more outdoor furniture. Lucky Dallas-Forth Worth gardeners to be able to shop at both!

For a tour of the Dallas Redenta’s, click here.

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Monarchs flutter into Dallas Arboretum on fall migration


We weren’t the only visitors to the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden last Sunday. Aside from all the human visitors, hundreds of monarch butterflies arrived on the north wind blowing into Texas and settled into the garden for a rest stop.


I understand their fall migration is stalled out at the moment because southerly winds have returned. But not to worry: north winds will return soon and speed them on their way to Austin and on to Mexico.


After all that flying, they sure were hungry.


They flapped past in their eagerness to hit the snack bar of salvia, red yucca, and lantana. It warmed our hearts to see them, knowing their numbers are in decline, and having just watched a film about their life cycle, Flight of the Butterflies, at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science.


I showed you the fall extravaganza of Pumpkin Village in my last post, but there’s much more to see at the Arboretum. Fall bedding annuals like these marigolds make a cheerful show, although they were not attracting the butterflies.


What else was showy? Blazing red gomphrena, for one.


Add variegated tapioca and you have a sunglasses-worthy combo.


Interesting water features appear throughout the gardens, like this negative-edge pool overlooking White Rock Lake in the Woman’s Garden.


And this tumbling stream in the Red Maple Rill garden.


How about supersized, water-spouting toads? The Arboretum has those too.


Kids are always drawn to these “frog fountains” and play in the spouting water in the summertime.


On this day it was comfortably cool — no toad spray needed.


This squirrel appreciated a drink of puddled water though.


Several charming sculptures hint at the presence of water, like the playful Chico y Chica de la Playa (Boy and Girl on the Beach).


The Playdays young woman tentatively dips her toes into an imaginary pool filled with frogs. White Rock Lake in the distance adds a real water view.


As always, lots of pro photographers were in the garden (too many, in my opinion), including at least a half-dozen doing photo shoots with girls in candy-colored, frothy, Scarlett O’Hara-worthy quinceanera dresses. Something about this girl posing in the Fern Dell put me in mind of a fairy tale, maybe Thumbelina?


Speaking of ferns, I spy a leafy frond through the stone lantern’s window.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the Arboretum visit. For a look back at the light-hearted, colorful Pumpkin Village and autumn displays, click here.

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Pumpkin extravaganza at the Dallas Arboretum


The Dallas Arboretum goes pumpkin crazy each fall.


Last Sunday we visited to see their over-the-top Pumpkin Village, in which a whopping 65,000 pumpkins, gourds, and squash are used to create play houses, line paths, and fill a pumpkin patch that would make Linus proud.


The pumpkin houses are fun for kids and adults alike.


Metal rings on the walls hold an assortment of pumpkins and squash.


More are piled around the doorways in artful displays.


Interiors are decorated with strings of tiny pumpkins along thatched ceilings and printed children’s stories on the walls.


As in in any proper village, the houses have unique designs. This one is all orange pumpkins.


Spray-painted jack ‘o lantern faces on some add a little spooky fun.


But not too spooky


This is a smart way to decorate pumpkins in the South, where those carved too soon collapse in on themselves in the heat.


This house is truly child-sized. Potato vine spills across the roof like a fairy tale beanstalk.


A fenced pumpkin patch guarded by friendly scarecrows contains pumpkins grouped by type — and there are so many varieties! Hand-lettered signs tell you what each type is called.


Boo!


Cinderella’s carriage, pulled by horses made of cornhusks and other natural materials (sorry, my pics didn’t come out), sits near a pumpkin patch filled with blue-painted and white pumpkins. I like how the sprawling sweet potato vines stand in for pumpkin vines.


Pumpkins also transform into sunflowers!


I think these are adorable.


Indian corn and tiny pumpkins are festively strung between trees.


How do they do it? Copper wire wraps the pumpkins and corn and secures them to a steel cable.


Stacked pumpkins, like Halloween totem poles, add structure to beds of colorful marigolds.


Orange marigolds echo the pumpkins’ shape and color.


A statuary cornucopia is surrounded by a real-life one.


Orange pumpkins beyond count line the paths.


White pumpkins take over by the Alex Camp House to match the white brick.


The front porch display features white pots filled with fall annuals and more pumpkins.


This is an unexpected and fun combination: golden shrimp plant and Persian shield, with more pumpkins along the walk.


I also love this vignette, though I don’t know what the plants are.


Just look at the size of those pumpkins!


Piles of pumpkins, squash, and gooseneck gourds adorn the entry garden.


The gift shop is getting in on the action too.


If you want to bask in the pumpkin glory, the Pumpkin Village will be on display until November 26. (I hated to see it so early, but they’re also already putting up the Christmas display, which opens November 16.) The Arboretum is offering early admission hours on weekends through the end of October: 8 a.m. for visitors and 7 a.m. for members. And if you’re a member of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, you’ll enjoy reciprocal free membership at the Dallas Arboretum!

Up next: Monarchs flutter into Dallas Arboretum on their fall migration

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.