Nonirrigated native plant garden of Lee Clippard is a foliage lover’s dream


Earlier this month I visited the East Austin garden of Lee Clippard, blogger at The Grackle, and his partner, John. The first fall rains had just arrived, following a relatively mild summer, so their foliage-centric garden of native plants was looking lush and green. I’d never have guessed, if Lee hadn’t told me, that he didn’t once irrigate his garden all summer, aside from a one-time spot watering of a wilting American beautyberry just off the front porch.


Smart plant choices make the no-water garden possible, although of course even these drought-tolerant natives must have water to get established. Once established though, the plants are on their own. Lee chucks the ones that don’t thrive and adds more of those that do.


You might recognize Lee’s garden from my book, Lawn Gone!; I profiled his garden in an early chapter. Lee screened the front garden with shade-tolerant foliage plants like palms, loquat, and Turk’s cap to give privacy and a sense of enclosure to a small gravel patio and to create green views from their windows.


Streetside, all that textural foliage makes for a secret-garden effect. What’s on the other side?


Entering the front garden you see a rectangular gravel patio edged with chopped limestone. A patio set used to sit here, but now there’s just a simple, wooden bench, very Zen.


A triangular stone sculpture sits in a soft patch of Texas sedge (Carex texensis) along one corner of the patio, framed by loquat and paleleaf yucca (Yucca pallida).


It’s a serene, inviting space framed by sedge and yuccas, with leafy shrubs along the perimeter screening the street from view. The stone path at right makes a friendly path for the mailman to cut through from the neighbor’s yard.


Lee gardens with a goal of attracting wildlife, with flowering prairie plants like coneflower where he has more sun along the driveway, and plenty of roosting and nesting places for birds, insects, and other beneficial wildlife.


He lets plants stand after they go to seed in order to provide food for birds. A large spineless prickly pear adds structure to this “wilder” section of the garden.


Around back, a wood-slat arbor and gate invite you into the back garden. Spanning the gap between house and detached garage, the arbor offers shade from the Death Star and enclosure for their dog. A lovely cut-stone path set in gravel draws the eye and foot into the space.


To the right, on the wall of the garage, a trough fountain with a small copper spout pours a thin stream of water that seems to cool the sizzle of a hot day.


Ahead, a grilling station is set up near the back door, which leads to the kitchen. Hanging from a corner of the eave, a rain chain directs rainwater, when it comes, to a bowl filled with colorful, egg-shaped river rocks.


Native horseherb (Calyptocarpus vialis), considered a weed by some, provides a low-maintenance, no-water groundcover.


I think Lee made these concrete bowls, which he uses as succulent planters and to hold pretty river rocks.


The stone path makes a right-angle turn behind the garage, leading to a gravel patio and, farther along, to an herb garden. Here at the corner, terracotta pots of cactus and succulents attract the eye…


…and soften the base of four cedar posts that support a “ceiling” of string lights around the gravel patio.


Lee and John inherited the mortared-brick Celtic knot with the house, but they enlarged the patio space around it to make more room for entertaining. It’s a beautiful focal point for their patio.


They made the 8-foot-long wooden bench themselves. It’s backed by a fringe of inland sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium).


Red, recycled-plastic Adirondacks add hot color.


The purple berries of American beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) add plenty of rich color too.


Enjoy them while you can, before the mockingbirds find them!


The back of the garage is a place for Lee to showcase his potted-plant collection. He and John also use the wall (hung with a sheet, I assume) for showing outdoor movies with friends.


An insect hotel hangs from the corner of the house, part of Lee’s effort to attract bees and other beneficial bugs.


Behind the garage, Lee and John made a small, raised-bed herb garden. Anchoring the space is a signpost pointing to places that have special meaning to them. Wooden chaise lounges offer a place to catch a little sun, and a wooden-slat screen hides a view of the neighbor’s yard. In front of the screen, a tufted lawnette of Texas sedge (Carex texensis) makes an emerald groundcover.


We live in a big country, don’t we? A thousand miles, at least, whether you head for the East Coast or the West.


Pomegranates are ripening.


And lantana is blooming — more fall color that attracts butterflies.


And here’s another look at the Texas sedge lawnette.


I love that quilted look.


A metal grackle is a reminder that this is the home of The Grackle blog. If you haven’t ever read it, do. Lee’s posts are always thoughtful and beautifully photographed, with good information about wildlife and native-plant gardening and Tex-Zen design.

My thanks to Lee and John for sharing their inspiring waterwise garden with me again. Readers, if this has whetted your appetite for more, click for my spring 2012 visit to Lee’s garden. Also, see Lee and John discuss the design of their garden on Central Texas Gardener.

This is my October post for Foliage Follow-Up. I’d love to know what lovely leaves are making you happy in your October garden (or one you’ve visited). Please join me for Foliage Follow-Up, giving foliage plants their due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave your link to your Foliage Follow-Up post in a comment. I really appreciate it if you’ll also include a link to this post in your own post (sharing link love!). If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it.

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Native plants and modern garden furnishings at Redenta’s Garden Arlington


Whew! I just got home from a whirlwind trip to New York City to visit public gardens, and does Austin ever feel blissfully small and non-crowded in comparison to Manhattan. The High Line was the highlight, and I’ll have pictures for you soon. But first I’ve been wanting to share my recent visit to Redenta’s Garden in Arlington, between Dallas and Fort Worth.


This is the second Redenta’s location I’ve visited. The first was Redenta’s smaller Dallas shop and urban nursery, which carries contemporary pots and accessories that reminded me somewhat of West Coast garden shops I’ve visited.


Both locations have a hip potting bar where you can plant up containers with succulents and cactus.


Fermob bistro sets and other colorful, contemporary garden seating can be found here as well.


I imagine tender succulents are tucked in the greenhouse in the winter, but on this October visit it was open to refreshing breezes.


In addition to contemporary style, Redenta’s is known for its native plant selection, and that’s what the suburban Arlington location really offers: room for more plants.


While Redenta’s isn’t as big as Austin’s Barton Springs Nursery, not to mention The Natural Gardener, it does have a nice selection of drought-tolerant beauties like hesperaloe with yellow bloom spikes as well as the standard coral-pink. I think I see some red ‘Brakelights’ in there too.


The yellow hesperaloe echoes the color of a classic motel chair sitting by a silver Airstream camper in the display yard. I could tell this area is usually a focal point of the grounds, with seating and pots on an urbanite (recycled concrete) patio, shaded by a striped awning. But we visited the day after a strong windstorm had hit the Dallas area, and the nursery was still picking up after the damaging winds.


Yucca rostrata shadows and a succulent “R” for Redenta’s add punch to this vignette.


At the other end of the yard, more seating is grouped around a metal-ring fire pit, surrounded by pots of agave, yucca, and prickly pear.


This is very “Austin,” don’t you think?


The Yucca rostrata were tempting, but how would I get one home? Instead I was drawn to the display of Hover Dishes on the front porch. I haven’t found these for sale anywhere in Austin (although I’ve ordered one directly from the Vancouver manufacturer, Pot Inc.), but Redenta’s had a great selection.


I selected the orange Dolga pot, and my DH gave it to me for my birthday, which just happened to be that day. Perfect timing for a visit, eh? I’m going to hold onto it over the winter and plant it up with succulents in the spring. Or maybe I’ll fill it with pumpkins and hang it right now!


Inside the shop, Redenta’s has more containers and garden accessories…


…including a selection of Steel Life containers, which are also hard to find at Austin nurseries.


Overall I like the Dallas Redenta’s better for their garden-shop offerings, but the Arlington location has a bigger plant selection and more outdoor furniture. Lucky Dallas-Forth Worth gardeners to be able to shop at both!

For a tour of the Dallas Redenta’s, click here.

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Love just around the bend at Bella Madrona: Portland Garden Bloggers Fling


For our final tour on the Garden Bloggers Fling in Portland last month, our bus stopped on a rural highway and deposited us in a field with a few pieces of rusty farming equipment strewn about. Not sure what to expect, I walked through open gates adorned with the garden’s name, Bella Madrona. Suddenly a pulsing beat and falsetto vocals filled the air. The disco anthem “Stayin’ Alive” was playing throughout the garden via hidden speakers. This was going to be a party!


A dramatic red and black garden greeted us as we entered.


Va-va-voom reds


Beech hedges, like arched Gothic columns, framed the space, creating doorways and windows, while this black pot sat like a cauldron atop a mossy pedestal.


A mysterious and romantic mood was set.


A concrete dolphin sporting a red crystal on its head? Why not?


Crocosmia and red-tinged banana leaves, along with mossy chairs, make for a lost-in-the-jungle vibe.


Intimate seating areas like this appear throughout the 5-acre garden, amid slightly overgrown, romantically tangled gardens.


Paths branch off in different directions, curving around hedges and shrubs so that you can’t tell what’s ahead. Randomly selecting the left-branching path, I came across a barn-like, ivy-cloaked guest house. Old wash buckets decorate the side.


On the porch, all manner of cast-off items are turned into strange and spooky still lifes.


Following the path onward, I paused to admire these stars set in the gravel. As soon as I got home I dug some old metal stars out of my garage and set them in one of my paths.


At the base of some steps, a series of monumental, angular arbors appeared, beckoning one downhill and into the woods.


I did not heed their call, tempted as I was by another path leading elsewhere, and I never made it back to this area in my 2-hour wanderings. How I wish I had! It led to an eerie gnome garden and high-flying swing that others have blogged about.


Instead, I walked this way, drawn by a small seating area atop a curved double stair backed by a doorway hedge.


Looking through from the other side


The terracing contained a dripping fountain of metal pipes jutting out of the rocks, which fed a small pool.


Just beyond that, a larger gathering space appeared, as well as “waterfall” steps leading up past billowing white hydrangeas. You can’t really see it in this photo, but a terraced stream runs downhill alongside the path. Heading upward and around the bend…


…my heart gave a start as I peeked beneath low-hanging branches to see what a glimmer of blue might be. I find this vignette creepily fascinating. It’s like the garden is populated with otherworldly characters that come to life after dark.


But although the sun was low in the sky, it was still light, and Aretha Franklin was belting out “R-E-S-P-E-C-T” over the speakers. I couldn’t be too spooked. Soon I came upon a tousled, English-style border, and all eeriness disappeared.


Spiky eryngium — love!


Tall pedestals along the back of the border support potted ‘Color Guard’ yuccas and add drama to the scene.


The columns themselves are set in planters made of steel rings.


More flower-border goodness


And more. I love the rich colors.


I watched a hummingbird working the border for some time and caught one blurred image.


The other side of the border was intriguing also, with a spiky, orange-tinged Solanum pyracanthum in front of a tiered metal fountain. I once tried to talk Loree of Danger Garden into this plant at Cistus Nursery. “But you need it. It’s dangerous!”


Speaking of whom, there’s Loree with Peter, The Outlaw Gardener, who’s giving me a this-is-the-life wave.


And here’s Loree again, one of our incredibly organized, generous, and welcoming Fling hosts.


Bella Madrona is the 34-year-old creation of two retired physicians, Geof Beasley and Jim Sampson. Their magical garden is regularly the site of fundraising benefits, and the band Pink Martini, which has performed here, wrote “The Gardens of Sampson and Beasley” about it. Stacks of Pink Martini’s CD Hang On Little Tomato, which contain the song, were generously donated to our group by the band when they heard we would be visiting the garden.


This skeleton affixed to the front of a truck in the driveway is perhaps a nod to the owners’ former profession? It reminded me of a similar hood ornament at Wamboldtopia at the Asheville Fling in 2012. Actually, the whole garden bears a certain resemblance to Wamboldtopia, especially in its mysteriously magical mood and cast-off-object artistry.


Wandering past the front of the house, I came across a living bottle tree.


Chunks of glass were stuck in the folds of its massive trunk, reminding me of the pig’s teeth in the wych elm of Howards End.


A carved, wooden figure wearing a tin hat, with a piercing, blue-eyed gaze, emerged from a swath of ferns.


Here’s a striking use for a steel pipe remnant.


And a wire sphere


Heading back down into the main gardens I entered a room bordered by a randomly crennelated hedge — Piet Oudolf meets Sleeping Beauty’s castle.


Secret gardens at every turn


And inviting, wandering paths…


…full of mystery…


…and beauty…


…and “danger”…


…and romance.


A cracked, hollow sphere appears, egg-like, to hatch an ornamental grass. I’m fairly certain this is a Little and Lewis piece.


How could anyone resist paths that beckon you on with curves and hidden rooms ahead?


What lies around the bend?


A boulder with glass horns and a spot to sit with a friend and enjoy the view…


…surrounded only by grasses and conifers.


A few steps down from the chairs and table…


…I came upon a golden garden around sunset.


It glowed with gold and chartreuse foliage. I felt I’d stepped into King Midas’s garden.


Continuing on, I encountered a pair of red chairs enclosed by tall…thistles?


In yet another small clearing, a sundial or clock made of chains, round pavers, and straight sections of slate reminded me that it was getting late.


Heading back, I was enchanted to find a small patio paved with bottoms-up wine bottles. I wonder where they get all these bottles?


Oh, never mind. Here’s a beautiful bouquet on a table of drinks and food set up for our group on the main lawn.


Our group of 80 bloggers, plus one very enthusiastic bus driver, gathered here for refreshments and conversation…


…sitting with friends for a while before drifting away to explore the winding paths of Bella Madrona.


What a magically wonderful way to end the Fling.

My thanks to the owners of Bella Madrona and all the other gardens for welcoming us so warmly into your delightful creations. And huge applause and congratulations to the Portland Fling planning committee — Scott Weber at Rhone Street Gardens, Loree Bohl at Danger Garden, Heather Tucker at Just a Girl with a Hammer, Jane Howell-Finch at MulchMaid, and Ann Amato-Zorich at Amateur Bot-ann-ist — for putting together such an incredible event. Thank you, thank you!

Up next: A pre-Fling drive out to the scenic, wild Columbia River Gorge and then to Cannon Beach. For a look back at the foliage-rich, xeric garden of John Kuzma, click here.

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.