European formality with relaxed Texas style in Ware Garden: San Antonio Open Days Tour


Last Saturday I road-tripped to San Antonio for the Open Days garden tour, sponsored by the Garden Conservancy. Shirley Fox of Rock-Oak-Deer was one of the organizers this year, and I was eager to see the gardens that she’d chosen for the tour.


The Ware Garden is the grandest, an estate-size property entered via a gate with stag sculptures on limestone pilasters. A long, curving drive leads past clipped yew and boxwood hedges, and you might think you’re only going to see lawn and live oaks.


Not so! Masses of tufty Mexican feathergrass add subtle golden color and texture beneath live oaks along the drive, where a dry stream channels runoff.


A circular pool and spouting fountain appear near the house, set in an emerald lawn amid the dark, gnarled trunks of dozens of live oaks.


And here it’s seen from the home’s front terrace. The live oaks make this scene magical, elevating it from something classically formal and rather ordinary — a fountain in a big, open lawn — and giving it a fairy-tale, dark-wood dimension. There’s a sense of mystery here.


Turning around, you see the front steps to the house — not at all ostentatious but rather a study in elegant simplicity: a pyramid of limestone steps, potted boxwood spheres, and a scrolled iron lantern alongside a handsome wooden door.


Side view


Walking around the house, you get a jolt of humor from a glass-mosaic cow wearing the Texas flag and gazing at a limestone-edged swimming pool, as if longing to take a dip.


In front, a fountain splashes in a raised rectangular pool, with a rill that leads the eye across the pool, where it stops at a perfectly manicured boxwood hedge, clipped to the same dimensions as a limestone retaining wall to the right.


Past the pool, a gentle slope is terraced with a low limestone wall. The house wraps around a rectangular lawn studded with more live oaks.


Clipped boxwood in various pots makes a simple and elegant accent throughout the garden.


Shallow limestone-and-gravel steps lead past a wing of the house with expansive windows, which I imagine provide a lovely view of the evergreen landscape. I believe that’s our native palmetto (Sabal mexicana) lifting its droopy-leaved fans to mingle with live oak limbs.


Palmetto and cast-iron plant add lush-leaved, subtropical San Antonio style (also common in Austin).


Details are simple and clean lined.


Rustic features like the rough cedar arbor are pure Central Texas.


The brochure says that the owners “envisioned a European garden reminiscent of a hotel where they had lived for three years. Architect Don McDonald…designed terraces around the house as a stage for beautifully sheared boxwood hedges and classic European pots planted with boxwood balls.”


A relaxing limestone-and-gravel terrace along the guest house…


…enjoys a view of the swimming pool and those wonderfully bent and twisted live oak trees and a gray-trunked Texas persimmon.


At the end of the lawn, a vine-draped cedar pergola with a faux bois bench offers a shady place to enjoy the view.


Looking back toward the main house


The beautifully pruned live oaks are the stars of this understated garden.


A lacy limb drapes around a narrow window in the guest house.


A small terrace off the main house features a built-in outdoor fireplace made of limestone.


A carved stone flower makes a pretty accent on the gravel paving.


A last look at the fountain, pool, and Cow Tex.


On the opposite side of the house, by a detached garage, a terraced boxwood parterre and center patio are framed by a monumental, grid-like trellis constructed of rough cedar posts and cloaked in fig ivy. The trellis runs from the garage to the house, connecting the two and creating a sort of window-walled garden room.


Clipped boxwood parterre, set off by limestone-and-brick paving.


In the central patio space, a faux bois table and chairs invite you to sit and enjoy the view. Under that long, snaking live oak limb, a handsome limestone trough and outdoor faucet make an outdoor sink.


The faux bois looks remarkably like real wood.


The elegant — and enormous — detached garage creates another sheltering wall for this outdoor space.


At a corner of the garage, in a space that might easily be overlooked, a wooden folding chair and white-garden urn create a pretty vignette.


There’s more to explore from here, as a limestone-paver path leads between boxwood spheres and olive and pine trees out to an olive grove.


Nearby, beneath the shady canopy of live oaks, classical planters and a wooden table and chairs beckon.


The classicism of this garden, tempered with rustic Central Texas features like limestone edging and shaggy cedar posts, is very appealing. European formal landscaping meets relaxing Texas style in the Ware Garden, and I loved it.

Up next: The Tupper Beinhorn Garden in San Antonio’s Monte Vista neighborhood.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Don’t miss the Austin Open Days garden tour sponsored by the Garden Conservancy on November 4.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Botanical art at Stutsman garden, plus Dallas/Fort Worth nurseries


I road-tripped up to Dallas/Fort Worth last weekend with a friend for two days of garden visiting and nursery shopping. The Garden Conservancy was hosting an Open Days tour in Fort Worth on Sunday, and my favorite garden turned out to be that of metal artist Wanda Stutsman. I don’t think she made the pieces pictured above, but they make a charming focal point on her garden shed.


Wanda’s specialty is forging botanical creations out of metal, like this light pillar with cut-outs of Japanese maple leaves. It’s beautiful in the daytime and even more so at night, as seen on Wanda’s website Fern Valley Art. She also makes lights with oak and palm leaves.


Displayed throughout her garden, her metalwork adds personality and humor — like the windmill blades in this framed picture, subbing for the sun — to her patio spaces and garden beds.


Her biggest piece was this wide gate at the top of her rural property, with coneflowers, daylilies, canna leaves, and a birdbath represented larger than life.


This gate really announces that a gardener lives here, doesn’t it?


We also visited both Redenta’s Garden nurseries, one in Arlington and the other in Dallas. At the Arlington Redenta’s a patch of frostweed (Verbesina virginica) was attracting dozens of pollinators, like this monarch.


Fueling up for the journey to Mexico.


I’d never seen a great black wasp before — at first I wondered if it was a tarantula hawk — but one of the employees ID’d it for me. It was very large but not scary, intent as it was on those flowers.


At the Dallas Redenta’s, which is smaller and more urban, I admired this lovely arrangement of round pots — one with a pineapple! — and Fermob planting boxes by the entrance.


I spotted this painted pumpkin display at Nicholson-Hardie Nursery in Dallas. But oh my, where I emptied my wallet was at their Garden Center just down the street from the nursery. Much more than a garden center, it’s a home goods and gift shop with a botanical theme. Don’t miss it if you’re in the area.

By the way, today is the San Antonio Open Days tour, organized by my friend Shirley Fox. I’m eager to see the gardens, and I promise you’ll love Linda Peterson’s garden, which I’ve blogged about here and here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get ready for fall garden tours in Texas! The Garden Conservancy is sponsoring Open Days tours in San Antonio on Oct. 14th and Austin on Nov. 4th.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Pumpkins in the land of Oz at Dallas Arboretum


Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain! But the woman in front of the curtain? That’s Diana, my friend and fellow explorer last weekend at the annual Pumpkin Village at Dallas Arboretum. This year the Arboretum carries you off like a tornado to “The Wonderful World of Oz,” with pumpkin houses representing Auntie Em’s house, the Wicked Witch’s castle, the Emerald City, and more.


I’m always amazed at what the festival staff pulls off, and this year’s Oz theme may be the best yet. A yellow brick road spirals through piles of pumpkins — more than 90,000 pumpkins, squash, and gourds are used for the display — toward Auntie Em’s house…


…where a big pumpkin appears to have flattened the Wicked Witch of the East. Her stripe-stockinged legs are all that’s left of her, those famous ruby slippers already on someone else’s feet.


In a “cornfield” of dried stalks, the Scarecrow points the way to the Emerald City.


I half expected him to come to life and start dancing.


In a grove of trees stands the Tin Man, already wearing his ticking heart gift from the Wizard.


The Cowardly Lion, wearing his flowerpot crown and medal of courage, stands nearby.


Little pumpkins strung vertically with twine hang from the trees.


One of those trees isn’t very happy about trespassers! Check out that face…


…and a clenched twig fist, ready to hurl a small pumpkin!


Black sweet potato vine darkens the pumpkin house that belongs to the Wicked Witch of the West.


One of her flying monkeys perches on the roof.


The Emerald City’s pumpkin house is adorned, appropriately, with green sweet potato vine.


Inside each house, murals depict scenes from the story.


Munchkin Land is represented with a white pumpkin house…


…with its own sweet potato vine doorway.


Building materials


A small “lake” of gray and white pumpkins is home to a flock of geese gooseneck gourds. So clever!


The place was, naturally, a madhouse with families picking out pumpkins in the pumpkin patch and taking pictures of their kids. I’m just a big kid myself and delighted in exploring the place. Although I searched, I never did see Dorothy, Toto, or the Wicked Witch and wonder if I missed them or if the Arboretum hires actors to play them or what.


Pumpkins are a theme well beyond the Oz display. We spotted these decorated pumpkins, with push-on features you could purchase in a kit.


So cute!


I love all three of these.


The Arboretum is all about wowing you with masses of annuals and perennials in showy arrangements.


That style of garden is not usually my thing, but the Arboretum does it so well that I always end up enjoying the spectacle.


Yellow marigolds — a cottage garden classic done to perfection here with purple-black castor bean plant and bordered by a row of orange pumpkins.


Artfully piled pumpkins of every color and shape surround large containers overflowing with big tropical leaves and annual color.


So much orange and yellowwww — I love it! Golden rudbeckia and orange mums about to pop are edged with orange pumpkins.


Rudbeckia ‘Sonora’, maybe?


Black sweet potato vine, croton, and millet make a wonderful autumnal combo in this pot, set off by lipstick-pink flowering canna in the background.


Gorgeous cannas


Golden narrowleaf zinnia


An allee of crepe myrtles, their bare lower branches making web-like shadows on the ground, leads to…


…a small plaza with four bronze toads spouting water toward the center.


I’d love to see the garden again in a couple of weeks, when all the Japanese maples turn orange and red. In the foreground is a touchable shrub I’m now wondering if we can grow here in Austin: ‘Franky Boy’ arborvitae.


A ‘Bloodgood’ Japanese maple offers some early fall color.


Spiderweb catching the light


A curved arbor of sky vine offers a tantalizing glimpse of a stone fountain.


Sky vine blossoms (Thunbergia grandiflora)


I always enjoy this playful sculpture at the base of a formal stair lined with potted boxwoods: Chico y Chica de la Playa (Boy and Girl on the Beach).


Must be a nude beach.


Millet (thriller), marigold (filler), and sweet potato vine (spiller) make a cool combo.


Who knew pumpkins could make so many plants look even better?


And this! Weeping blue atlas cedar with variegated liriope and big, orange pumpkins.


‘Tis the season for pumpkin enjoyment, so if you have a chance to visit Dallas Arboretum this fall, the pumpkin display runs through November 22nd.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get ready for fall garden tours in Texas! The Garden Conservancy is sponsoring Open Days tours in San Antonio on Oct. 14th and Austin on Nov. 4th.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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