Succulicious Foliage Follow-Up


I get succulent fever every time I see a display like this. A luscious succulent fountain dripping with string-of-pearls senecio — what better way to introduce a “watery” feature into your garden without using much actual H2O?


Let’s take a little field trip to Hill Country Water Gardens & Nursery this Foliage Follow-Up and bask in the succulent goodness.


They’re like candy, aren’t they? HCWG really has a flair for displaying their plants and pots. I wanted one of each…but resisted, as I have cuttings of my own to use right now.


Back at home, this image may be a bit of a cheat for Foliage Follow-Up because the soaring bloom stalk of Moby, my whale’s tongue agave (A. ovatifolia), is all you notice right now. That giant asparagus spear will eventually support a candelabra of flowers at its tip, and I can’t wait to see how it turns out. For a little while longer, though, Moby is still the best-looking foliage plant in my garden.

This is my April post for Foliage Follow-Up. Fellow bloggers, what leafy loveliness is going on in your garden this month? Please join me in giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I’d appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it. I look forward to seeing your foliage faves.

I welcome your comments! If you’re reading this in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment link at the end of each post.

_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Come see me at Festival of Flowers in San Antonio, May 28, time TBA. Learn more about water-saving gardening during my talk at San Antonio’s 19th annual Festival of Flowers. Get a signed copy of my book after the talk. Tickets to the all-day festival, which includes a plant sale and exchange, speakers, and a flower show, are available at the door: $6 adults; children under 10 free. Free parking.

Do you review? Have you read my new book, The Water-Saving Garden? If you found it helpful or inspirational, please consider leaving a review — even just a sentence or two — on Amazon, Goodreads, or other sites. Online reviews are crucial in getting a book noticed. I really appreciate your help!

I’m on Instagram as pamdigging. See you there!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Fresh greens and purple power for Foliage Follow-Up


Chartreuse and dark gray make a trendy combo that’s as pleasing in the garden as in the home. Evergreen Texas sedge (Carex texensis) practically glows in spring with the addition of nubby seedheads.


A wider view shows purple heart (Tradescantia pallida) romping through the sedge, with the orange and green of Mexican honeysuckle (Justicia spicigera) in the background. Although the sedge–purple heart combo is an accident — the purple heart resprouted from an earlier removal — it makes a nice color echo of the dark gray wall, as a visitor pointed out to me last fall.


Speaking of purplish gray, ‘Macho Mocha’ mangave is looking fine. Pink knotweed (Persicaria capitata ‘Magic Carpet’), which I randomly planted in this dappled-shade spot a few years ago, makes a good partner for it, with a color echo and contrasting leaf size and form. Unfortunately, the knotweed has never taken off. Perhaps the soil is too dry.

Now that I see the possibilities of small pink flowers and low, narrow leaves to contrast with the muscular, eggplant-colored mangave, I’m wondering if pigeonberry (Rivina humilis) would be a good native substitute. I think I’ll try it.


Hulking over the scene (you can see a bit of the mangave at left) is Moby, my whale’s tongue agave (A. ovatifolia). I’ve paired the glaucous agave with other favorite foliage plants that can handle dry soil and dappled shade: variegated flax lily, foxtail fern, ‘Chocolate Chips’ manfreda, ‘Bloodspot’ mangave, and santolina.

This is my March post for Foliage Follow-Up. Fellow bloggers, what leafy loveliness is going on in your garden this month? Please join me in giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I’d appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it. I look forward to seeing your foliage faves.

I welcome your comments! If you’re reading this in an email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment link at the end of each post.

_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Come meet me at Zilker Garden Festival, Austin, TX, April 2 & 3
Come see me at Zilker Fest between 10 am and 2 pm, on both Saturday and Sunday, at the Author Booth (near the main building entrance), where I’ll be signing and selling my books ($20 each). Zilker Fest offers all-day entertainment, vendor shopping, plant sales, demonstrations, live music, a beer garden and food vendors, children’s activities, a garden train, a flower show, and a docent-led tour of lovely Zilker Botanical Garden! Click here for full details.

Look for me on Instagram as pamdigging. See you there!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Shrub trouble for Foliage Follow-Up


I have shrub trouble (shrubble?). No, this isn’t a picture of it. This is my succulent wall, which is doing beautifully this mild, dry winter, and which simply glows in late afternoon light.


Here’s the “shrubble.” One of my favorite evergreens for shade and deer resistance, Chinese mahonia (Mahonia fortunei) has, for the second winter in a row, developed a bad case of powdery mildew. It looks as if a careless painter has splattered it with white paint.


I’m generally laissez-faire about plant diseases and pests, and last winter when the leaves got all mildewy I did nothing and hoped for the best. And it worked — or seemed to. The problem cleared up by summer.


But now it’s back, and worse than ever. I think I’m going to have to take action. Any suggestions?


Rather than end on a sad foliage note, let’s have another look at the beautiful succulents. No powdery mildew there!

This is my February post for Foliage Follow-Up. Fellow bloggers, what leafy loveliness is going on in your garden this month? Please join me in giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I’d appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it. I look forward to seeing your foliage faves.

_______________________

Upcoming Events and News

Join me for my kick-off garden talk for my new book, The Water-Saving Garden, on February 27, at 10 am, at The Natural Gardener nursery in southwest Austin. My talk is called “Hold the Hose! How to Make Your Garden Water Thrifty and Beautiful,” and it’s free to the public. Afterward I’ll have books available for purchase and will be glad to autograph one for you! Dress for the weather, as the talk will be held in the big tent outside.

Look for me on Instagram as pamdigging. See you there!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Follow