Refreshed porch pots and tiki hut


Happy Sunday morning! After a week of family illness at Chez Penick, I finally got in some gardening time this weekend. Here are my refreshed containers on the back porch steps. The purple oxalis (Oxalis triangularis) in the turquoise pot gets all the oohs, and no wonder. It’s a beauty. It goes partially dormant in winter but always comes roaring back in spring.

I repotted the Texas license plate planter (purchased from Potted a couple of years ago) with cuttings of the succulent I had in there before. It had gotten leggy and rootbound, and it was time for a refresh. So easy — you just cut off the tops of the succulents, set them somewhere shady and warm for a couple of days to let the cuts harden off, and then replant in cactus mix and top with fine gravel.

I impulsively purchased two dianthus (EverLast series ‘Lavender Lace’ and ‘Light Pink + Eye’) at Shoal Creek Nursery recently, and after dithering about where to plant them, I stuck them both in an empty pot. I’m enjoying the clove-scented bouquet, but I’ve moved them to a sunnier spot so they’ll keep blooming for a while.


If you’re wondering about the tiki hut mentioned in the title, no, it’s not mine. While shopping at Hill Country Water Gardens & Nursery, I couldn’t help admiring their plant-bedecked palapa. How fun! Wouldn’t this be great to lounge under, next to a swimming pool?

That’s all for now. I hope you’re enjoying some garden time this weekend too!

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The upcoming talk with James deGrey David has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added. Subscribers get advance notification when tickets go on sale for these limited-attendance events.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Marvelous maroons for March Foliage Follow-Up


One of my favorite spring-blooming shrubs for bright shade features raspberry flowers and maroon leaves. It’s Chinese fringeflower (Loropetalum chinense ‘Sizzling Pink’), and its richly colored foliage contrasts beautifully with blue-green paleleaf yucca (Y. pallida) in a purple pot. Variegated pittosporum ‘Cream de Mint’ adds shade-brightening foliage at ground level.


A slightly different view shows more of the fringeflower flowers. In back, a shiny, silver culvert pipe-turned-planter helps brighten the shade and brings out the gray tones in the loropetalum leaves.


More maroon appears in a low pipe planter in the front garden: a trio of ‘Burgundy Ice’ dyckias. Talk about fab foliage! I love its color and starburst form, although this spiny plant easily draws blood with vicious teeth. Orangesicle flower spikes in spring make it even better.


The deer think so too. Those dyckia flowers lasted, oh, about a week before the deer found them. So it goes!

This is my March post for Foliage Follow-Up. Fellow bloggers, what leafy loveliness is happening in your garden this month? Please join me in giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I’d appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it. I look forward to seeing your foliage faves.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The upcoming talk with James deGrey David has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added. Subscribers get advance notification when tickets go on sale for these limited-attendance events.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Read my article in Country Gardens about East Austin Succulents


If you like Austin’s thrift-store, anything-goes, fun-loving style, especially in gardening, check out my article about Eric Pedley’s nursery East Austin Succulents in the current issue of Country Gardens magazine (Spring 2017, pages 70-75). You can read all about Eric’s unique junk-store finds, LP-cooking adventures, and how he creates the coolest succulent containers you’ve ever seen.


I’m particularly excited about this article, not only because it shows off one of Austin’s wonderful nurseries, but because it’s my first article for Country Gardens AND it’s my first producer credit! As the producer I worked with photographer Ryann Ford to help stage the photos, giving me a behind-the-scenes look at a professional magazine shoot.


I know you’ll enjoy Ryann’s photos of Eric’s fun and funky succulent containers, as well as Eric’s tips about creating them.

If you’re not a subscriber, you can find the magazine at newsstands and bookstores, including Barnes & Noble. This issue, I found, is wrapped in plastic and packaged with a floral coloring booklet, so you’ll have to buy it to read it. And then you can color too.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The upcoming talk with James deGrey David has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added. Subscribers get advance notification when tickets go on sale for these limited-attendance events.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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