Foliage plants in bloom for Foliage Follow-Up


Even plants we grow primarily for the beauty of their leaves and their form will flower. On this Foliage Follow-Up, I’m sharing two bold-foliage plants that are adding a jolt of drama with surprising bloom stalks.

One is dwarf Texas palmetto (Sabal minor), a native Texas plant that I’ve never seen in bloom before. Boy, was I surprised recently to see a slender, pliable flower spike arise from the heart of one of my sabals. Inconspicuous, cream-colored flowers are held on branching stems along the top of the spike. This is as showy as they get. Later, small black fruits should appear on the spike.


Regular readers know that Moby, my whale’s tongue agave (A. ovatifolia), is blooming — a tree-like flower spike that shot up to 15 feet in a matter of weeks. Tiers of yellow flowers are opening from bottom to top, with the lower-tier flowers already faded and dropped. The topmost flowers are still in bloom for now.

As dramatic as the bloom spike is, it presages Moby’s death, since agaves bloom just once and then die.


Moby’s beautiful blue-gray leaves still look pretty good for now. The plant hasn’t begun its inevitable collapse. But in preparation for that day, I now have a new Agave ovatifolia waiting in the wings — a lovely gift from horticulturist Nathan Unclebach at Hill Country Water Gardens & Nursery! Meet ‘Vanzie’, a wavy-leaved variety of the standard whale’s tongue, which will take Moby’s place when he dies.

This is my June post for Foliage Follow-Up. Fellow bloggers, what leafy loveliness is going on in your garden this month? Please join me in giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I’d appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it. I look forward to seeing your foliage faves.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Do you review? Have you read my new book, The Water-Saving Garden? If you found it helpful or inspirational, please consider leaving a review — even just a sentence or two — on Amazon, Goodreads, or other sites. Online reviews are crucial in getting a book noticed. I really appreciate your help!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Coneflower frenzy at Wildflower Center


What better greeting than a plethora of purple coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea)? The ballerina-skirted beauties are brightening the entry to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center right now. Like Dr. Seussian trees, several multi-trunked Yucca rostrata stand behind them, adding shimmery drama.


The long view


Needle-sharp gray agaves — Agave neomexicana, I think — and grasses add starburst forms but vastly different textures to this beautiful, early-summer scene.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Do you review? Have you read my new book, The Water-Saving Garden? If you found it helpful or inspirational, please consider leaving a review — even just a sentence or two — on Amazon, Goodreads, or other sites. Online reviews are crucial in getting a book noticed. I really appreciate your help!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

May flowers from A (agave) to V (vitex)


As the days fly toward summer, the daylilies are showing off their lovely throats…


…and blushing, ruffled petals. Here’s ‘Best of Friends’.


The first ‘Apple Tart’ smolders among the white-striped flax lilies.


Stretching on long stems like giraffe necks, ‘Wilson’s Yellow’ daylily stands tall amid grasses and aster foliage.


Chaste lilac (Vitex agnus-castus) blooms extravagantly in clusters of rich purple.


Firecracker fern (Russelia rotundifolia) revs up as the days grow hotter, dazzling the copper snake.


And what’s Moby, my whale’s tongue agave (A. ovatifolia), up to? The lowest two tiers of flowers are now open.


The banana-like buds have opened into a densely packed fringe of golden stamens.


They’re quite lovely.


It’s like a flowering tree has erupted from the center of the agave!


Two annual ‘Black Pearl’ peppers (Capsicum annuum) overwintered (the garden didn’t get a hard freeze this year), and they’ve already bloomed and produced their distinctive black, glossy, berry-like peppers. The nearly black leaves are just as striking.


Heartleaf skullcap (Scutellaria ovata), a lovely, summer-dormant native groundcover, is at peak bloom, its lavender spires standing tall over pewter leaves.


And my sweet boy Cosmo surveys his domain from his favorite perch, one of the stucco seat walls, at day’s end.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Tomorrow: Come see me at Festival of Flowers in San Antonio, May 28, 10:45-11:45 am (new time!). Get inspired to save water in your garden during my presentation at San Antonio’s 19th annual Festival of Flowers. I’ll be at the book-signing table after the talk, with copies of both The Water-Saving Garden and Lawn Gone! available for purchase. Tickets to the all-day festival, which includes a plant sale and exchange, speakers, and a flower show, are available at the door: $6 adults; children under 10 free. Free parking.

Do you review? Have you read my new book, The Water-Saving Garden? If you found it helpful or inspirational, please consider leaving a review — even just a sentence or two — on Amazon, Goodreads, or other sites. Online reviews are crucial in getting a book noticed. I really appreciate your help!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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