Fixing a floppy Will Fleming yaupon for Foliage Follow-Up


‘Will Fleming’ yaupon (Ilex vomitoria ‘Will Fleming’), a fastigiate cultivar of our native yaupon holly, is one of my go-to vertical accent plants. It’s a green punctuation mark, ideal for adding height to a flat bed or using in multiples as a narrow hedge to screen an ugly view. In sun or shade it’ll grow to 10 or 15 feet (I like to give mine flat-top haircuts at about 6 feet tall) but only 1 to 2 feet wide. Sometimes, however, the outer branches go a bit floppy, ruining the vertical shape.


Like this — not the look I was going for.


You might think this calls for the pruners. Stop! Put the pruners down and grab a pair of scissors and a spool of fishing line instead. Tie one end of a length of fishing line loosely around a branch, leaving room for the branch to grow. Loosely wrap the fishing line in a spiral around the body of the tree, thereby creating a neat column again. Tie it off, taking care not to tie or wrap any part of the line tightly. You don’t want to strangle your tree. A gentle touch is all that’s needed.


And voila! A columnar ‘Will Fleming’ is restored.


One more time — floppy!


And fixed!

‘Will Fleming’ yaupon is my Foliage Follow-Up featured plant this month. Please join me in posting about your lovely leaves of April for Foliage Follow-Up, a way to remind ourselves of the importance of foliage in the garden on the day after Bloom Day. Leave your link to your Foliage Follow-Up post in a comment. I really appreciate it if you’ll also include a link to this post in your own post (sharing link love!). If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it.

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Wildflowers and more in bloom at the Wildflower Center


For Garden Bloggers Bloom Day let’s go to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center here in Austin. I visited on Sunday with family who were in town, hoping to see some bluebonnets. We saw a lot more than that, including these beautiful pink flowers that resembled apple blossoms. Does anyone know what native Texas shrub or tree this might be? Update: It’s a Texas crabapple, also known as Blanco crabapple (Malus ioensis var. texana). Thanks for the ID, Linda/Patchwork Garden and James Smith!


Texas bluebonnets spilled through grassy meadows like spring-fed streams.


They also popped up in surprising places, like this green roof atop the admissions booth.


Swagged from the orange-toned stone walls in the entry garden, ‘Tangerine Beauty’ crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) added its orange trumpets.


In the Hill Country Stream Garden, pink penstemon raised its cerise signal flags.


A closer look


The yuccas were blooming too, sending spears adorned with creamy, bell-shaped flowers into the sky.


At the edge of a woodland garden, scarlet buckeye (Aesculus pavia) was putting on a big show.


A closer look


A wider shot is nice too.


I missed the label for this swath of pale-blue salvia, but the delicate flowers showed up nicely en masse.


Another soft scene, with no flowers to speak of, but I did admire the mixed textures of grass, maidenhair fern, and yucca.


Wild foxglove’s pale flowers (Penstemon cobaea) are held above glossy, green leaves.


And another crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) drapes over a wooden fence in the Texas Mixed Border Homeowner Inspiration Garden.


I love that rich color, and so do hummingbirds.


The Demonstration Garden was abloom with people, checking everything out…


…like fiery orange California poppy.


We climbed to the top of the observation tower, where I saw a green valentine in this bristly prickly pear pad.


Glowing like coals in a banked fire were the extravagant blooms of claret cup cactus (Echinocereus triglochidiatus).


A closer look


Finally it was time to head out. As we walked through the parking lot to our car, I spotted sunny yellow wildflowers at the edge of the lot…


…and completely covering the ground in a water retention basin.


A few Indian paintbrush were scattered throughout as well.

What a beautiful spring scene! To see my paparazzi pics of the great horned owl nesting at the Wildflower Center, which I posted yesterday, click here.

I’m joining other bloggers for the Bloom Day meme with this post. Visit May Dreams Gardens to see what’s blooming in other gardens around the world on this date. And don’t forget to join me tomorrow for Foliage Follow-Up!

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Great horned owls on the nest at the Wildflower Center


With family in town last weekend, smack in the middle of wildflower season, we made a visit to one of my favorite places in Austin: the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. Sure, I wanted to see bluebonnets and other spring flowers, but I also knew a secret that not everyone who visits knows.


A great horned owl nests each year in a planter niche on the stone walls of the entry garden (officially known as the South Texas Mission Garden), by the Wetland Pond. She’s there right now. Do you see her?


How about now?


A telephoto lens or a pair of binoculars will give you a better peek. She’s found the perfect, protected spot under a spiny Wheeler sotol but still enjoys a commanding view.


I don’t know if it’s the same owl that returns every year or maybe a descendant, but she’s raising three fuzzy chicks in the sotol niche.


The chicks were a little shy on this day, but here you can see one amid the sotol leaves, with the same lamp-like eyes as Mama.


Peek-a-boo!


Edging around to the left, I spotted a more curious sibling on the other side of the sotol. Adorable!

For comparison, and for owl lovers, here are my posts about great horned owls at the Wildflower Center in previous years:
Blossoming spring morning at the Wildflower Center, part 1, April 21, 2013
Winter into spring at the Wildflower Center, February 20, 2013
Great horned owl chicks growing up fast, May 2, 2011
Great horned owlets nesting at Wildflower Center, April 20, 2011

All material © 2006-2014 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.