Linda Peterson’s green-walled xeriscape garden: San Antonio Open Days Tour


The highlight of the recent San Antonio Open Days garden tour, as I knew it would be, was Linda Peterson’s beautiful xeriscape and green-walled courtyard garden. Twice before I’ve had the pleasure of exploring Linda’s garden (in September 2015 and April 2016), and the artistry of her plant combinations, skillful pruning, and integration of garden art always delights.


Since I’ve written about Linda’s garden twice before (see links in top paragraph), I won’t do a play-by-play of her garden features. Let’s just stroll, shall we? First, the front garden outside the gray-green courtyard walls…


Agave weberi with purple-flowering cenizo. Lucky Linda for having her barometer plant — i.e., cenizo — burst into bloom for the tour! The timing of an ephemeral cenizo bloom cannot be planned since it responds to rainfall and/or air pressure changes.


A pair of octopus-armed steel agaves accent a corner planting of cenizo (pruned up like small trees), sprawling dalea, and ‘Blonde Ambition’ grama grass.


Linda has a knack for artfully pruning plants. She’ll prune up foliage to show off trunks or lift a plant’s “skirts” above the gravel mulch. Even shrubby rosemary gets neatened up with selective under-pruning.


A sinuous live oak’s snaky limb reaches out from a hole in the wall to embrace a stump seat and a wood-plank table.


It’s wonderful, and a one-of-a-kind feature that epitomizes Linda’s embrace of the Texas climate and its natural beauty.


A side view from the front walk, where a stepping-stone path leads around the tentacled live oak


Society garlic blooming alongside another steel agave


My friend Cat and I both exclaimed over this cute-as-a-button flowering plant, which looks like a compact gomphrena. I can’t remember the ID from Linda, but I distinctly remember her telling me she found it at Lowe’s. Go figure! Update: It’s Gomphrena ‘Pinball Snow-Tip Lavender’ — what a mouthful.


“Beware: Sharp spiny plants with evil intent” — that dry humor is a dead giveaway that Linda made up this sign herself. And of course we gardeners know the real purpose of such a sign is to protect our precious plants, not the people who read it. Mind your feet, people!


Doesn’t look particularly evil, does it?


Heading around to the side yard


I always get a kick out of this grinning crocodile planter.


A Gulf fritillary butterfly enjoying purple lantana


Wavy-leaved prickly pear


Another big Weber agave


Tree limbs embrace overhead, as soap aloes hoist orange-flowered bloom spikes.


On the other side of the front yard, a side path widens into a small patio with a rustic bench. A green cloud of bamboo muhly grass hides the neighboring driveway from view.


“I’m nuts about you,” this stone squirrel could be saying to the Agave mediopicta ‘Alba’. (Groan)


Palms in culvert-pipe planters and a Weber agave


Looking back from the end of the path you get a marvelous view of the writhing arms of the Weber agave underplanted with writhing foxtail fern, backed by writhing live oaks. That’s a lot of writhing!


Step into the walled courtyard and you’re in Linda’s private outdoor living room. A pair of metal rhinos contemplates crossing the patio for a drink at the Mexican beach pebble “stream.” A winding river of soap aloes echoes the curving stone stream, and a variegated agave seems to wave encouragingly.


Metal armadillos root around in the garden bed.


The patio by the outdoor fireplace looks bigger and more inviting than ever. Linda has lightened up this year with fewer chairs and a see-through table.


An outdoor rug adds a bit of coziness and definition too.


A built-in bench along the wall holds an assortment of pumpkins, squash, succulents, and a candle lantern.


Even the metal barrel cactus were lit during the tour!


Such a relaxing space


Don’t you want to lounge here and take a nap under the live oaks?


A metal iguana guards a stand of ‘Vertigo’ pennisetum and a container fountain.


A couple of chairs plumped with pretty teal pillows with small mirrors sewn on for sparkle


I love Linda’s flowers made of bent copper tubing.


They show up so well against the minty green wall.


Heading around to the back garden, you stroll past a collection of potted plants and an elevated deck with cattle-panel privacy screening.


Cattle panel deck skirting is cloaked with fig ivy. No, it doesn’t stay this way on its own. Linda trims it to show off the grid pattern of the wire panel.


Understated pots in shades of brown are guarded by a metal horny toad — Texas’s state reptile, ya know.


A faux-bois fountain is a focal point at the end of the driveway.


An umbrella-shaded patio beckons where the path curves around the house.


A hanging wicker egg chair and bench offer additional seating.


Two metal giraffes nibble bamboo leaves nearby.


There’s not a patch of lawn in this low-water garden, but even so it feels lush and green.


Where there used to be a bottle shrub, Linda now has a hanging bottle tree, a less-common variation on the trunk- or pole-style bottle tree of the South. Linda uses lots of hanging objects — plants, lanterns, bottles — to draw the eye upward into the trees.


On a terrace off the back of the house, privacy is assured with a striking, contemporary privacy screen, which Linda designed out of leftover scraps of roofing metal (after their standing seam roof was installed) and she and her family riveted together. A bubbling fountain container topped with blue slag glass and a collection of containers completes the appealing scene.


Container detail


My thanks to Linda for sharing her remarkable garden again and letting us linger there so long!

And thank you, dear reader, for following along on my recap of the San Antonio Open Days Tour. I unfortunately ran out of time to see a couple of the tour gardens, but I enjoyed the ones we saw. For a look back at the old San Antonio style of the Tupper Beinhorn Garden, click here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Don’t miss the Austin Open Days garden tour sponsored by the Garden Conservancy on November 4.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Historic San Antonio style in Tupper Beinhorn Garden: San Antonio Open Days Tour


Compared with the formality of the Ware Garden, the rambling Old San Antonio style of the Tupper Beinhorn Garden couldn’t be more different. I visited last weekend during the San Antonio Open Days Tour sponsored by the Garden Conservancy. Located in the historic and charming Monte Vista neighborhood, the 1928 Spanish Colonial Revival home was the star of this property, with shrubby palms, mature trees, groundcovers, and potted plants playing a supporting role to the architecture.

A pieced-stone front walk leads through a small lawn with two different kinds of turf laid out in asymmetric curves. I found that a bit distracting, but I do like the walk with circular focal point, and I love that cobalt and tiled door surround. At the left corner of the house…


…a patio with a built-in bench echoes that asymmetry using the same rusty flagstone as the front walk. I don’t know that this casual patio with stacked-stone edge works in the context of this particular house. A more formal, geometric layout would perhaps be a better fit, especially if constructed as a welcoming terrace between the driveway and the front door. However, I do always appreciate a front-yard sitting space, and this one enjoys privacy thanks to a dense planting along the street and driveway (at right).


Another patio space appears in the side yard along the driveway, with lacy iron seating painted a mustard yellow. What instantly grabbed my attention, however, were white stucco walls with inset tile-mosaic pictures of rural Mexican scenery. Cloaked in fig ivy and topped with a woven extension for added privacy, the walls create the feeling of a romantic hideaway.


The driveway leads to a small parking court and detached guest house.


Under a pergola for sheltered parking, you see more tile pictures on the wall, with wavy prickly pear in a narrow raised bed below.


The tile pictures portray scenes of rural life in Mexico a century ago.


This one is my favorite, with an out-of-scale variegated agave resembling a kraken from the deep!


The guest house is charming with scrolled ironwork and a doorway awning. Matching hanging baskets trail greenery on each side of the door.


Built into the right corner of the guest house is a Moroccan-style niche with benches and beautiful mirror-tile mosaic — a focal point from the driveway.


A hideaway for romantic liaisons?


Mosaic detail


From here you enter the back garden behind the main house.


A casual array of container plants creates separation and privacy, and a wide, vine-swagged arbor offers entry.


The landscaping is not over-fussed. A bit of lawn, a collection of containers, and a relaxed vibe indicate that the owners are pretty casual about their garden.


Again, the architecture of the home is what stands out: an outdoor fireplace with built-in bancos, a woven awning held up by scrolled ironwork, another mirror-tile mosaic (fabulous), and a red-tile roof.


A turquoise lap pool surrounded by a narrow, brick-paver terrace is the focal point of the garden.


The terrace widens behind the pool, allowing space for a dining table surfaced in matching brick pavers.


The stucco walls, softened with climbing vines, create enclosure and privacy and show off more mosaic-tile pictures. A stucco-walled woodshed is stocked for the outdoor fireplace.


A flagstone patio at the back of the guest house connects via a stepping-stone path. Gingers, ferns, and sago palms add lush, subtropical greenery under the shady tree canopy.


Dwarf mondo grass outlines the terracotta-hued flagstone, and a cushioned bench adds a similar dash of color. At right, atop a low stacked-stone wall, a large urn with a spigot collects rainwater from a downspout, allowing the owners to easily water their containers.


Touring this casual garden in one of San Antonio’s prettiest neighborhoods was a treat, especially for the chance to see a historic home with plenty of Alamo City charm.

Up next: Linda Peterson’s green-walled, low-water garden and courtyard patio. For a look back at the Europe-meets-Texas Ware Garden, click here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Don’t miss the Austin Open Days garden tour sponsored by the Garden Conservancy on November 4.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

European formality with relaxed Texas style in Ware Garden: San Antonio Open Days Tour


Last Saturday I road-tripped to San Antonio for the Open Days garden tour, sponsored by the Garden Conservancy. Shirley Fox of Rock-Oak-Deer was one of the organizers this year, and I was eager to see the gardens that she’d chosen for the tour.


The Ware Garden is the grandest, an estate-size property entered via a gate with stag sculptures on limestone pilasters. A long, curving drive leads past clipped yew and boxwood hedges, and you might think you’re only going to see lawn and live oaks.


Not so! Masses of tufty Mexican feathergrass add subtle golden color and texture beneath live oaks along the drive, where a dry stream channels runoff.


A circular pool and spouting fountain appear near the house, set in an emerald lawn amid the dark, gnarled trunks of dozens of live oaks.


And here it’s seen from the home’s front terrace. The live oaks make this scene magical, elevating it from something classically formal and rather ordinary — a fountain in a big, open lawn — and giving it a fairy-tale, dark-wood dimension. There’s a sense of mystery here.


Turning around, you see the front steps to the house — not at all ostentatious but rather a study in elegant simplicity: a pyramid of limestone steps, potted boxwood spheres, and a scrolled iron lantern alongside a handsome wooden door.


Side view


Walking around the house, you get a jolt of humor from a glass-mosaic cow wearing the Texas flag and gazing at a limestone-edged swimming pool, as if longing to take a dip.


In front, a fountain splashes in a raised rectangular pool, with a rill that leads the eye across the pool, where it stops at a perfectly manicured boxwood hedge, clipped to the same dimensions as a limestone retaining wall to the right.


Past the pool, a gentle slope is terraced with a low limestone wall. The house wraps around a rectangular lawn studded with more live oaks.


Clipped boxwood in various pots makes a simple and elegant accent throughout the garden.


Shallow limestone-and-gravel steps lead past a wing of the house with expansive windows, which I imagine provide a lovely view of the evergreen landscape. I believe that’s our native palmetto (Sabal mexicana) lifting its droopy-leaved fans to mingle with live oak limbs.


Palmetto and cast-iron plant add lush-leaved, subtropical San Antonio style (also common in Austin).


Details are simple and clean lined.


Rustic features like the rough cedar arbor are pure Central Texas.


The brochure says that the owners “envisioned a European garden reminiscent of a hotel where they had lived for three years. Architect Don McDonald…designed terraces around the house as a stage for beautifully sheared boxwood hedges and classic European pots planted with boxwood balls.”


A relaxing limestone-and-gravel terrace along the guest house…


…enjoys a view of the swimming pool and those wonderfully bent and twisted live oak trees and a gray-trunked Texas persimmon.


At the end of the lawn, a vine-draped cedar pergola with a faux bois bench offers a shady place to enjoy the view.


Looking back toward the main house


The beautifully pruned live oaks are the stars of this understated garden.


A lacy limb drapes around a narrow window in the guest house.


A small terrace off the main house features a built-in outdoor fireplace made of limestone.


A carved stone flower makes a pretty accent on the gravel paving.


A last look at the fountain, pool, and Cow Tex.


On the opposite side of the house, by a detached garage, a terraced boxwood parterre and center patio are framed by a monumental, grid-like trellis constructed of rough cedar posts and cloaked in fig ivy. The trellis runs from the garage to the house, connecting the two and creating a sort of window-walled garden room.


Clipped boxwood parterre, set off by limestone-and-brick paving.


In the central patio space, a faux bois table and chairs invite you to sit and enjoy the view. Under that long, snaking live oak limb, a handsome limestone trough and outdoor faucet make an outdoor sink.


The faux bois looks remarkably like real wood.


The elegant — and enormous — detached garage creates another sheltering wall for this outdoor space.


At a corner of the garage, in a space that might easily be overlooked, a wooden folding chair and white-garden urn create a pretty vignette.


There’s more to explore from here, as a limestone-paver path leads between boxwood spheres and olive and pine trees out to an olive grove.


Nearby, beneath the shady canopy of live oaks, classical planters and a wooden table and chairs beckon.


The classicism of this garden, tempered with rustic Central Texas features like limestone edging and shaggy cedar posts, is very appealing. European formal landscaping meets relaxing Texas style in the Ware Garden, and I loved it.

Up next: The Tupper Beinhorn Garden in San Antonio’s historic Monte Vista neighborhood.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Don’t miss the Austin Open Days garden tour sponsored by the Garden Conservancy on November 4.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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