Wavy scaly cloakfern for November Foliage Follow-Up


“I got a rock,” Charlie Brown complains while trick-or-treating. But I was happy to find this holey limestone rock at Redenta’s in Dallas last month. Yes, I actually bought a rock as a planter. Later, at The Natural Gardener, I happened upon this unusual plant — wavy scaly cloakfern (Astrolepis sinuata), a dry-loving native Texas fern — and decided to give it a try in the rock.


According to the Wildflower Center’s website:

“Astrolepis sinuata is a lower elevation, dry habitat fern typically found growing underneath evergreen desert & semi-desert shrubs in rocky soil or rock crevices. Although the fronds like to be in full sun, the roots like [to] remain shaded. This fern is semi-evergreen…with thick green fronds, the undersides of which are cinnamon in color, forming a tight 18[-in] wide upright clump with a short creeping rhizome.”

Mine’s in more shade than is ideal, but it sounds like a dry rock planter will be to its liking.


Plant Delights, which sells it by mail, adds this warning — or challenge, depending on how you look at it:

“This attractive southwest US native is found on limestone outcrops and slopes from Texas south to South America, but is rarely seen in cultivation…This is not a fern to be tried by beginners, as it is not as easy to cultivate as most others. In nature, it usually grows with its roots hidden beneath a large rock.”

I hope I don’t kill it!


And because today is Foliage Follow-Up, I’ll end with the patio view from my living room — nearly all foliage plants, including purple oxalis (Oxalis triangularis) on the stairs, various potted succulents, and an evergreen vine on the fence.

This is my November post for Foliage Follow-Up. Fellow bloggers, what leafy loveliness is happening in your garden this month? Please join me in giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I’d appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! I look forward to seeing your foliage faves.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Calling all garden bloggers! You’re invited to register for the annual Garden Bloggers Fling tour and meetup, which will be held in Austin next May 3-6, 2018! Click this link for information about registering, and you can see our itinerary here. Space is limited, so don’t delay. The 2018 Fling will be the event’s 10th anniversary, which started in Austin in 2008.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Festive color and a little Dia de los Muertos in Lucinda Hutson’s garden


A visit to Lucinda Hutson‘s home and garden always feels like being at a party. Brightly colored walls and accessories, garden rooms with playful themes (like the mermaid garden pictured here), and Lucinda’s own excitement at showing you what’s flowering or fruiting create a feeling of festivity.


An under-the-sea theme suits Lucinda’s mermaid garden

Lucinda kindly opened her garden gate to me and Seattle author/designer Karen Chapman, who was in town for my latest Garden Spark event and to get photos for her upcoming book about deer-resistant gardens. Lucinda doesn’t contend with deer herself, but she was in the midst of decorating for Dia de los Muertos, and I was eager to see her garden again and share it with Karen.


In the mermaid garden, Lucinda’s mermaid grotto consists of a tiny pond backed by a rugged limestone wall, adorned by a large mermaid bowl and statue. Water-loving plants green up the scene.


Seashells accent the bowl, which, even with a deep crack, makes a charming focal point.


A seashell wreath sets the tone on the garden gate. It’s hard to see, but the wreath is hung around a mermaid on the gate.


A fishy stepping stone continues the theme.


In the next garden room, La Tina — Our Lady of the Bathtub — is mosaicked into an actual bathtub set upright in another limestone wall.


A colorful metal agave occupies a cedar bench, with chartreuse sweet potato vine contrasting with a blue-painted fence.


A mosaic of colorful tiles — including ears of corn! — decorates the exterior of Lucinda’s kitchen window, while painted wooden chickens on the windowsill give us the side-eye. Pink-flowering queen’s wreath vine clambers up the purple wall.


Colorful pots and plates in the vegetable garden


A saffron-colored wall holds a collection of painted children’s chairs from Mexico.


Behind the house is Lucinda’s party deck, with an umbrella-shaded table…


…an oilcloth-covered buffet table with succulents in colorful pots…


…and rustic cedar chairs and wall display shelves.


At the very back of the garden, behind the garage, is Lucinda’s tequila cantina — a rustic “cantina” for tequila tastings under a cedar pergola topped with a flame-like metal agave.


A metal mariachi saws away at his fiddle, with a tequila bottle tree making a fun accent behind him.


A tiled stairway leads through an enclosed porch and into the house.


Lucinda had already hung up her Day of the Dead lady monarch, her purple wings glowing in the sunlight.


From the front, a gentle (not scary) skeleton face welcomes you to the party that is Lucinda’s autumn garden.


Me, Karen, and Lucinda

Thank you, Lucinda, for the lovely tour around your garden, and may your Dia de los Muertos be filled with sweet remembrances of dearly departed loved ones.

To see Lucinda’s garden in full Dia de los Muertos glory, click here for a peek at last year’s adornments.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Don’t miss the Austin Open Days garden tour sponsored by the Garden Conservancy on November 4.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Linda Peterson’s green-walled xeriscape garden: San Antonio Open Days Tour


The highlight of the recent San Antonio Open Days garden tour, as I knew it would be, was Linda Peterson’s beautiful xeriscape and green-walled courtyard garden. Twice before I’ve had the pleasure of exploring Linda’s garden (in September 2015 and April 2016), and the artistry of her plant combinations, skillful pruning, and integration of garden art always delights.


Since I’ve written about Linda’s garden twice before (see links in top paragraph), I won’t do a play-by-play of her garden features. Let’s just stroll, shall we? First, the front garden outside the gray-green courtyard walls…


Agave weberi with purple-flowering cenizo. Lucky Linda for having her barometer plant — i.e., cenizo — burst into bloom for the tour! The timing of an ephemeral cenizo bloom cannot be planned since it responds to rainfall and/or air pressure changes.


A pair of octopus-armed steel agaves accent a corner planting of cenizo (pruned up like small trees), sprawling dalea, and ‘Blonde Ambition’ grama grass.


Linda has a knack for artfully pruning plants. She’ll prune up foliage to show off trunks or lift a plant’s “skirts” above the gravel mulch. Even shrubby rosemary gets neatened up with selective under-pruning.


A sinuous live oak’s snaky limb reaches out from a hole in the wall to embrace a stump seat and a wood-plank table.


It’s wonderful, and a one-of-a-kind feature that epitomizes Linda’s embrace of the Texas climate and its natural beauty.


A side view from the front walk, where a stepping-stone path leads around the tentacled live oak


Society garlic blooming alongside another steel agave


My friend Cat and I both exclaimed over this cute-as-a-button flowering plant, which looks like a compact gomphrena. I can’t remember the ID from Linda, but I distinctly remember her telling me she found it at Lowe’s. Go figure! Update: It’s Gomphrena ‘Pinball Snow-Tip Lavender’ — what a mouthful.


“Beware: Sharp spiny plants with evil intent” — that dry humor is a dead giveaway that Linda made up this sign herself. And of course we gardeners know the real purpose of such a sign is to protect our precious plants, not the people who read it. Mind your feet, people!


Doesn’t look particularly evil, does it?


Heading around to the side yard


I always get a kick out of this grinning crocodile planter.


A Gulf fritillary butterfly enjoying purple lantana


Wavy-leaved prickly pear


Another big Weber agave


Tree limbs embrace overhead, as soap aloes hoist orange-flowered bloom spikes.


On the other side of the front yard, a side path widens into a small patio with a rustic bench. A green cloud of bamboo muhly grass hides the neighboring driveway from view.


“I’m nuts about you,” this stone squirrel could be saying to the Agave mediopicta ‘Alba’. (Groan)


Palms in culvert-pipe planters and a Weber agave


Looking back from the end of the path you get a marvelous view of the writhing arms of the Weber agave underplanted with writhing foxtail fern, backed by writhing live oaks. That’s a lot of writhing!


Step into the walled courtyard and you’re in Linda’s private outdoor living room. A pair of metal rhinos contemplates crossing the patio for a drink at the Mexican beach pebble “stream.” A winding river of soap aloes echoes the curving stone stream, and a variegated agave seems to wave encouragingly.


Metal armadillos root around in the garden bed.


The patio by the outdoor fireplace looks bigger and more inviting than ever. Linda has lightened up this year with fewer chairs and a see-through table.


An outdoor rug adds a bit of coziness and definition too.


A built-in bench along the wall holds an assortment of pumpkins, squash, succulents, and a candle lantern.


Even the metal barrel cactus were lit during the tour!


Such a relaxing space


Don’t you want to lounge here and take a nap under the live oaks?


A metal iguana guards a stand of ‘Vertigo’ pennisetum and a container fountain.


A couple of chairs plumped with pretty teal pillows with small mirrors sewn on for sparkle


I love Linda’s flowers made of bent copper tubing.


They show up so well against the minty green wall.


Heading around to the back garden, you stroll past a collection of potted plants and an elevated deck with cattle-panel privacy screening.


Cattle panel deck skirting is cloaked with fig ivy. No, it doesn’t stay this way on its own. Linda trims it to show off the grid pattern of the wire panel.


Understated pots in shades of brown are guarded by a metal horny toad — Texas’s state reptile, ya know.


A faux-bois fountain is a focal point at the end of the driveway.


An umbrella-shaded patio beckons where the path curves around the house.


A hanging wicker egg chair and bench offer additional seating.


Two metal giraffes nibble bamboo leaves nearby.


There’s not a patch of lawn in this low-water garden, but even so it feels lush and green.


Where there used to be a bottle shrub, Linda now has a hanging bottle tree, a less-common variation on the trunk- or pole-style bottle tree of the South. Linda uses lots of hanging objects — plants, lanterns, bottles — to draw the eye upward into the trees.


On a terrace off the back of the house, privacy is assured with a striking, contemporary privacy screen, which Linda designed out of leftover scraps of roofing metal (after their standing seam roof was installed) and she and her family riveted together. A bubbling fountain container topped with blue slag glass and a collection of containers completes the appealing scene.


Container detail


My thanks to Linda for sharing her remarkable garden again and letting us linger there so long!

And thank you, dear reader, for following along on my recap of the San Antonio Open Days Tour. I unfortunately ran out of time to see a couple of the tour gardens, but I enjoyed the ones we saw. For a look back at the old San Antonio style of the Tupper Beinhorn Garden, click here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Don’t miss the Austin Open Days garden tour sponsored by the Garden Conservancy on November 4.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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