Exploring Mueller’s Southwest Greenway, public art, and Texas Farmers’ Market


A week ago, my dad and I popped over to east Austin’s Mueller neighborhood for a springtime stroll around the Southwest Greenway. They have some pretty big spiders in those parts!


I love this sculpture, Arachnophilia by Houston artist Dixie Friend Gay, which stands 23 feet tall and straddles the walking trail. Her belly is full of green and blue glass gazing balls! Gigantic agaves add a living sculptural element alongside the trail.


Texas redbuds were in full bloom, and I had to stop and admire each one.


The trail skirts a small lake in the center of the park…


…where we spotted a great blue heron and a few white egrets fishing or frogging, plus lots of ducks.


The Southwest Greenway was planted with native grasses and other Texas prairie plants in partnership with the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. In late winter, tawny grasses predominate. But flowering trees are already coloring the prairie landscape, and soon wildflowers will steal the show. In the distance you can see two sculptures by Austin artist Chris Levack, Wigwam on the left and Pollen Grain on the right.


Here’s a closer view of Wigwam, with curving beds of prairie grasses and perennials at its feet.


With mass plantings of native trees and perennials, the Greenway shows how to use native plants in a contemporary way.


I like this tiny formal lawn too, which leads to a bench secluded by native shrubs, ornamental trees, and grasses.


Agarita (Mahonia trifoliolata) shows off golden, sweet-scented flowers at this time of year.


The spiny, gray-green leaves are pretty too.


Ah, but the early spring glory of flowering redbuds and Mexican plums!


A closeup of Texas redbuds in bloom. Why, I wonder, aren’t they called pinkbuds?


Mueller is a planned community built on the site of Austin’s old Mueller Airport, and some of the original airport structures have been preserved, like this old hangar. Dad and I were happy to stumble on the Texas Farmers’ Market in full swing here, which operates every Sunday from 10 am to 2 pm.


Vendors were selling vegetables, honey, sauces, bread, and more.


And since it was just a few days before Mardi Gras, a band decked out in tie-dye, purple, and beads, the Mighty Pelicans, were playing zydeco and blues. It was a party!


As we headed back to our car, we couldn’t help noticing a bunch of kids on a playing field wearing clear plastic bubbles. They’d run at each other and rebound hilariously. One kid got stuck upside-down and had to be righted with help from his coach.


I later learned it’s called bubble soccer. Who knew?


Near the science-based playspace for kids called Thinkery , we encountered another delightful public sculpture, Lake Nessie.


The glass-tiled sea serpent was created by Arachnophilia artist Dixie Friend Gay.

I love all the public art at Mueller, and the generous park spaces. It’s a fun place for a Sunday stroll.

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Vertigo grass has the blues after hard freeze


‘Vertigo’ pennisetum is singing the blues beautifully after three nights of hard freezes (mid 20s F) before Christmas. While other plants just look bleached and sad (variegated flax lily, I’m looking at you), this towering, dark-leaved grass still looks pretty, even though it’s now dormant.


The TerraTrellis sculpture behind it echoes those purply blues.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Outdoors at The Domain’s Rock Rose


My mother and I had lunch in the new Rock Rose section of The Domain (a New Urbanist-style live/work/shop development in North Austin) last week and poked around in the shops afterward. Naturally, I yanked my phone out along the way to take pictures of cool landscaping features, like this steel planter that doubles as a patio retaining wall at The Dogwood bar. Foxtail fern, silver ponyfoot, and red roses make a pretty, sun-loving combo. I like their painted sign-mural too.


Here’s a simple idea, taken from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams furniture store: a prickly pear pad (or two) stuck in contemporary pot topped with gravel. Why haven’t I ever done this with prunings from my opuntias?


A cloud-like arbor of aluminum or stainless steel floats over a public plaza near the Northside Lawn. It’s eye-catching as a sculptural element, and I suppose it offers filtered shade on hotter days.


A John Lennon song lyric mural is just begging to be used as a backdrop for engagement photos. It struck me as a hopeful message for these turbulent times too.

Rock Rose at The Domain, with a slew of local restaurants that we north Austinites formerly had to drive downtown or to South Austin to enjoy, feels a little like Disneyland, with its clean, walkable streets and idealized-Austin vibe. It has its haters, but it’s OK with me. A walkable shopping/dining area that’s not inside a mall (yuck) and that’s beautifully landscaped made for a nice day out with my mom. I’ll be back next time to try out East Side King’s Thai Kun.

Click for a look at the landscaping and public art in the original section of The Domain.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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