Summer solstice evening


A pink sunset through the trees drew me outside this evening, but then I got sidetracked by the garden, including this pretty combo of ‘Color Guard’ yucca, Mexican oregano (Poliomintha longiflora), and ‘Vertigo’ pennisetum, which has been a successful trial plant from Proven Winners for me, returning more faithfully each spring than regular purple fountain grass ever did.


Nearby, like outstretched hands, our native Texas dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor) waves hello.


As the garden goes to sleep on the summer solstice, our shortest night of the year, I give thanks for summer’s official arrival…and shorter days to follow. Take that, Death Star!

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Early summer garden offerings


A few offerings of early summer beauty in the garden. Beaked yucca (Y. rostrata ‘Sapphire Skies’) as seen from our deck — I enjoy this topside view of the spiky stunner.


The galvanized pie-plate planters I filled with succulent cuttings in March have filled out beautifully. Here’s one that I especially like, with a barbed-wire heart from an old wreath adding a Texas touch.


The orange hooked spines and starry white spines of a mammillaria cactus glisten with raindrops after a recent shower.


‘Painted Fingernail’ bromeliad in bloom, its dainty purple flowers rising from a basin of rainwater held in the center leaves. (I sprinkle the water with mosquito dunk crumbles to prevent mosquitoes from breeding here.)


And in the garden of my friend Cat at The Whimsical Gardener: a druid-like St. Francis cupping in his hands a stone heart nestled in blue glass.


A garden offering

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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by talented designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Datura glowing at twilight


After a sunset that turned the sky gold last evening, I took a twilight stroll through the garden*, Ruth Wilcox-style, and stopped to admire several datura blossoms perfuming the air.


Still sparkling from an afternoon downpour, the plate-sized, horned blossoms unfurled as the moon rose.


Now bring on the sphinx moths.

*Plant IDs in the top photo: ‘Monterrey Frost’ squid agave (Agave bracteosa ‘Monterrey Frost’), Datura wrightii, ‘Frazzle Dazzle’ dyckia (Dyckia choristaminea ‘Frazzle Dazzle’), whale’s tongue agave (Agave ovatifolia), and silver ponyfoot (Dichondra argentea).

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by talented designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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