Next Garden Spark talk is my own, includes book and garden tour

After hosting two other speakers this spring (Scott Ogden and James David), I’ve decided to offer a talk of my own for my fledgling Garden Spark series. On May 18, I’ll present “Water-Saving Gardens That Wow,” which will also include a signed copy of The Water-Saving Garden and a pre-talk guided tour of my garden.

Update 4/3/17: ***THIS EVENT IS NOW SOLD OUT. If you’d like to hear about future Garden Spark talks, please get on the mailing list. Send me an email and let me know you’d like to be added.***

“The recent Texas drought taught us that conserving water in our landscapes is crucially important. But that doesn’t mean our gardening options are limited to cacti and rocks! I’ll talk about design techniques that make the most of natural rainfall and simple ways to conserve water in your garden. I’ll also inspire you to create outdoor spaces that are so beautiful and inviting, it’s hard to believe they are water thrifty.”

Speaker bio: Pam Penick is author of The Water-Saving Garden: How to Grow a Gorgeous Garden with a Lot Less Water and the bestselling Lawn Gone! Low-Maintenance, Sustainable, Attractive Alternatives for Your Yard. She’s a contributor to such magazines as Garden Design, Country Gardens, and Wildflower, and her photographs have appeared in many books and magazines. On her award-winning blog, Digging, she offers an inspirational mash-up of garden tours, design tips, posts about drought-tolerant plants, and plenty of examples of water-saving gardens. She lives, gardens, and shakes her fist at the plant-noshing deer in Austin.

After the talk, I’ll have light refreshments to enjoy.

What: Garden talk by Pam Penick, “Water-Saving Gardens That Wow,” including a signed copy of her book The Water-Saving Garden and a pre-talk guided tour of Pam’s garden

When: Thursday, May 18, 2017, 7:30-8:30 pm. Pre-talk garden tour begins at 6:30 pm.

Where: Private home in northwest Austin (zip 78759)

How to attend: Send me an email requesting an invitation, and I’ll send you the link to the event page. By the way, email-list subscribers (just ask, and I’ll add you) get advance notification of these limited-attendance events.

Please note: Ticket sales are final. If the event doesn’t fill or is cancelled due to any unforeseen reason, full refunds will be given.

Garden Spark is a speaker series on garden design, open by invitation and hosted in my home. Admission goes entirely to compensate our excellent speakers.

To hear about future Garden Spark talks, send me an email and let me know you’d like to be added to the email list. Talks are limited-attendance, and invitations are sent first to those on the email list. If any spots remain, talks are announced publicly on Digging.

What is Garden Spark?

Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by top-notch design speakers out of my home, and I’m calling it Garden Spark!

Garden Spark talks are for anyone with an interest in gardening, garden design, and learning from design experts. You won’t find anything else like this in Austin! I know because I’m always looking for garden presentations geared to avid and experienced gardeners, by well-known designers and authors, and they just don’t come around that often.

Hosting at home keeps down expenses and creates a fun, intimate experience for a small number of guests: just 30 people. To attract excellent speakers I’m paying them a fair speaker fee, raised through ticket sales. For the cost of a movie, drinks, and popcorn, you can enjoy seeing a great garden speaker in a cozy, personal setting. I expect to host 3 to 4 talks per year.

Speakers will be announced on the Garden Spark page as well as in blog posts. Subscribe to Digging to have my blog posts delivered to your inbox. And if you join the Garden Spark email list, you’ll get advance notice of upcoming talks (and I’ll never share or sell your email address).

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.

Talking waterwise gardens, blogging & more on Still Growing Podcast


Have a seat at the kitchen table, and let’s have a chat! At least, that’s how it felt to be interviewed last week by Jennifer Ebeling, host of the popular Still Growing Podcast, for an episode about making water-saving gardens that airs today.


Jennifer Ebeling, host of Still Growing Podcast and blogger at 6ftmama (courtesy of Still Growing)

Jennifer and I weren’t really sitting at the table over a cup of coffee — she broadcasts out of Minnesota and I’m in Texas — but her personable, in-depth questions made for a casual, fun conversation with her about, oh, everything: my recent book The Water-Saving Garden; blogging; my family; how the Garden Bloggers Fling got started (hosted this year in Washington DC/Northern VA; register today!); and goodness knows what else.


Listen to my interview on Still Growing here. If you want to zip right to it, my interview starts at the 18:35-minute mark.


And just for fun, here are a few succulent dishes — very waterwise! — I’m enjoying right now. These do need freeze protection, even in my zone 8b garden, but I put them back outside in between our occasional freezes, and they brighten up the patio.


Also, you might have noticed that I got a little behind on my book review posts this week, but I have three more books to share with you very soon — reviews of Gardenista, Hummingbird Plants of the Southwest, and The Cocktail Hour Garden, so stay tuned! For a look back at my recent reviews of Texas Month-by-Month Gardening, Photographing Austin, San Antonio & the Texas Hill Country, and The Garden Bible, just click on the links.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

2/25/17: Come to my talk at the Wildflower Center. I’ll be speaking at the day-long Native Plant Society of Texas Spring Symposium at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin. My talk is called “Local Heroes: Designing with Native Plants for Water-Saving Gardens,” and it’s about creating water-wise home gardens that don’t sacrifice beauty. The symposium is open to the public. Click here for registration. I’ll be offering signed copies of my books, The Water-Saving Garden and Lawn Gone!, after my talk ($20 each; tax is included). I hope to see you there!

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The first talk with Scott Ogden has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Come hear my talk at the Wildflower Center on 2/25

On Saturday, February 25, I’ll be speaking at the day-long Native Plant Society of Texas (NPSOT) Spring Symposium at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas.

My talk is called Local Heroes: Designing with Native Plants for Water-Saving Gardens, and it’s about creating water-wise home gardens that don’t sacrifice beauty. Get inspired by before-and-after photos of native-plant gardens and and creative design ideas for water-conserving gardens!

The symposium is open to the public. Click here for registration. I’ll be offering signed copies of my books, The Water-Saving Garden and Lawn Gone!, after my talk ($20 each; tax is included). I hope to see you there!

Here’s the official info from the NPSOT website:

Registration includes entrance to the gardens and a boxed lunch. Pricing will be $55/person, or $50/members of the Society or Wildflower Center. Check-in on the day of the event begins at 8 am and the first speaker will start at 8:45. There will be five presentations:

Reflections on Water. Tom Spencer, best known as the host of Central Texas Gardener, is also director of Texas Living Waters Project. “A general and philosophical reflection on conserving water resources and cultivating a kind of rootedness where we as humans accept our personal responsibility to heal, steward and protect our environment.”

Integrating Native Plants in a High Use, Urban Area. Beth Carroll, project director of The Trail Foundation, will talk about using native plants on the hike-and-bike trails around Lady Bird Lake. “See how one of the largest and fastest growing cities in the U.S. is utilizing native plants in an urban, high-use, naturalized setting; specifically examining the intersection of human users and the needs of a healthy native plant ecosystem in the context of a riparian environment.”

Local Heroes: Designing with Native Plants for Water-Saving Gardens. Pam Penick, Austin-based blogger at Digging and author of Lawn Gone! and The Water-Saving Garden. Pam will have a book signing following her presentation. “A fresh look at creating water-wise home gardens that don’t sacrifice beauty. Get inspired by before-and-after photos of native-plant gardens and Pam’s creative design ideas for water-conserving gardens.”

Texan by Nature. Erin O’Neil Franz, executive director, will present an overview of the Texan By Nature organization. “A united effort of Texas citizens, property owners, and businesses who share a passion for the conservation of sustainable native landscapes, recognizing the tangible benefits of our natural resources for the health and prosperity of our people and land.”

Native Edible Plants: A Taste of Place. Andrea DeLong-Amaya, director of horticulture at the Wildflower Center. “Research and strong public interest of wild and native edibles are timely today, as it relates to health, history and culture giving humans our sense of place and taste.”

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Follow