Gorgeous flowering of a pond iris and more


As buds began to swell last week, I’ve been eagerly awaiting the flowering of my pond iris. And this morning, three burgundy, yellow-throated flowers unfurled.


They look especially picturesque as viewed against the turquoise shed doors.


Several more buds mean more flowers to come.


Jenny/Rock Rose gave me a division of this lovely iris in 2015. It bloomed for me that year, but last year…nothing.


So you can see why I’m excited about it now.


Other plants are in full bloom as well, including the pomegranate tree next to the beaked yucca.


Dozens of frilly, orange flowers resemble juju hats…


…or, when seen closer, ruffly crepe-paper flowers.


On the other side of the garden, star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides) perfumes the upper patio.


And although it’s not my garden, I have to share a sweet spring image of golden columbines, like shooting stars, at Zilker Botanical Garden last Saturday.


Oh, and congrats to Austin gardener Ruthie Burrus, whose charming stone garden haus smothered in ‘Peggy Martin’ roses appears in the current issue of Southern Living (April 2017)! I had the pleasure of visiting Ruthie’s garden a couple of years ago; click for the full tour.


And here’s the magazine cover if you want to pick up a copy to read all about her garden haus and roses.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The first talk with Scott Ogden has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Wildflower fields abloom at Wildseed Farms


A wildflower photo safari is my springtime ritual, and I especially like to drive out to the Texas Hill Country to photograph wildflowers against the rugged hills, rocks, and prickly pear. This spring, thanks to a mild winter, Texas bluebonnets (Lupinus texensis) are carpeting roadsides a few weeks early, so there was no time to lose if I wanted to see our state flower in its blue splendor.


Here’s what a field of bluebonnets looks like — sparkling blue heaven.


Unfortunately, while I saw plenty of bluebonnets along the roadsides from Spicewood to Llano, there was nowhere to safely pull over to photograph them, and I didn’t see any fields in bloom. Even scenic Willow City Loop off Highway 16 was downright sparse.


Happily, there’s always Wildseed Farms just east of Fredericksburg, where you can view farm fields of wildflowers, which they grow for their seed-selling operation. (Here’s my obligatory annual pickup truck-and-wildflowers picture.)


Right now Wildseed Farms has fields of bluebonnets and corn poppies in full flower.


Yesterday’s high winds made photographing the long-stemmed poppies challenging.


I always like spotting a few pink poppies amid the red ones.


I’ll leave you with a view of Enchanted Rock, which always deserves a detour if you’re driving Highway 16 north of Fredericksburg.

For my previous wildflower safaris, check out these blog posts:
Wildflower drive through the Texas Hill Country, March 2016
An Easter wildflower safari, April 2015
Wildflower safari in the Hill Country, April 2010
Texas wildflower Bloom Day, April 2010

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The first talk with Scott Ogden has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Path, pipe planter, and palmetto


This vignette caught my eye in the lower garden as I was blowing a bazillion live oaks leaves (yes, it’s live oak leaf-drop season!): a culvert-pipe planted with squid agave, ‘Sizzling Pink’ loropetalum (I love that burgundy foliage), and a stepping-stone path leading up to the slabs of natural limestone behind the pool. It’s nothing amazing, and two of my colorful hanging pots are a little distracting in this image. But still, the trees are aglow with new leaves, and the loropetalum is in full bloom, and so I paused to enjoy the scene.


A little closer, with blue-green Yucca pallida foliage showing nicely against the loropetalum. That’s ‘Cream de Mint’ pittosporum below — shade lovers all.


And now to completely change direction, here’s a scene I admired at Lady Bird Lake last weekend, a quintessential Austin pairing of native Texas palmetto and bald cypress. Always stop to admire the roses any plants you see! Happy weekend!

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The upcoming talk with James deGrey David has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added. Subscribers get advance notification when tickets go on sale for these limited-attendance events.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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