Three more gardens on Inside Austin Gardens Tour 2017


I’ve already posted about two of the gardens on this Saturday’s Inside Austin Gardens Tour, and today I’m showing a sneak peek of three more private gardens on the tour.

Garden of Dorothy Thering


Gardening on 23 acres in Spicewood, Dorothy Thering has room for a spacious and colorful greenhouse with welcoming patios (see top picture too).


Potted plants live in and around the greenhouse, and garden beds, a small pond, and a fire-pit patio add country-living ambience, not to mention acres of rugged Hill Country views.


Dorothy and her husband, Mike (pictured here), also have a fenced vegetable garden, chickens, beehives, a pony, and a pair of mini Nubian goats, Ethel and Lucy.

Garden of Peggy Hart


In suburban west Austin, Peggy Hart gardens sustainably with low-water plants, rainwater collection, and a pollinator garden.


A cheerful metal longhorn guards the back forty amid the cedars.


And a huuuuuge deck, only glimpsed here in the window reflection, provides a view of downtown and the UT Tower, plus lots of comfortable places to relax. Peggy accents the deck with fun art, like this metal spiderweb, and potted plants.

Garden of Velia Sanchez-Ruiz


In south Austin, Velia Sanchez-Ruiz contends with deep shade in her back garden, brightening it with mirrors, white pots and garden art, and lush greenery.


A metal angel reaches for the stars amid star-shaped leaves of Virginia creeper.


This pretty yellow-and-pink columbine doesn’t mind the shade.


Walking iris hasn’t walked out either.


Fragrant star jasmine flowers behind a meditative Buddha.


Out front, Velia grows sun-loving flowers, including an extensive collection of daylilies and even Queen Anne’s lace.

That’s it for my sneak peek of the tour, coming up Saturday, May 6th! For a look back at the cottage-meets-Zen garden of Daphne Jeffers and Shari Bauer’s whimsical found-art garden, both of which will also be on Saturday’s tour, click here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Mark your calendar for the Inside Austin Gardens Tour on May 6, sponsored by Travis County Master Gardeners. This fun garden tour occurs every 18 months and features a mix of homegrown gardens “for gardeners, by gardeners,” as their tagline says.

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

Marvelous maroons for March Foliage Follow-Up


One of my favorite spring-blooming shrubs for bright shade features raspberry flowers and maroon leaves. It’s Chinese fringeflower (Loropetalum chinense ‘Sizzling Pink’), and its richly colored foliage contrasts beautifully with blue-green paleleaf yucca (Y. pallida) in a purple pot. Variegated pittosporum ‘Cream de Mint’ adds shade-brightening foliage at ground level.


A slightly different view shows more of the fringeflower flowers. In back, a shiny, silver culvert pipe-turned-planter helps brighten the shade and brings out the gray tones in the loropetalum leaves.


More maroon appears in a low pipe planter in the front garden: a trio of ‘Burgundy Ice’ dyckias. Talk about fab foliage! I love its color and starburst form, although this spiny plant easily draws blood with vicious teeth. Orangesicle flower spikes in spring make it even better.


The deer think so too. Those dyckia flowers lasted, oh, about a week before the deer found them. So it goes!

This is my March post for Foliage Follow-Up. Fellow bloggers, what leafy loveliness is happening in your garden this month? Please join me in giving foliage its due on the day after Bloom Day. Leave a link to your post in a comment below. I’d appreciate it if you’ll also link to my post in your own — sharing link love! If you can’t post so soon after Bloom Day, no worries. Just leave your link when you get to it. I look forward to seeing your foliage faves.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The upcoming talk with James deGrey David has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added. Subscribers get advance notification when tickets go on sale for these limited-attendance events.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

New flowers opening each day


Regular readers know that my shady, dry, deer-infested patch of dirt is not a flowerlicious garden. And yet even I have, oh, at least 6 or 7 flowers in bloom as spring kicks off here in Austin. Like this sweet, nodding Chinese ground orchid (Bletilla striata). I bought one several years ago to see how it would do. Answer? Not much…until this year. Maybe it liked all the rain?


Now I’m tempted to buy more. It looks especially nice paired with purple-leaved oxalis (Oxalis triangularis).


Let’s bring that oxalis into focus, shall we?


For more purple, one need only look out front, where my earliest iris (sold as ‘Amethyst Flame’ but lately I’m not so sure) is flowering.


A trio of ‘Burgundy Ice’ dyckias in a steel pipe planter echoes a hint of the purple. The middle plant is starting to bloom, although each day I look outside expecting the deer to have gotten it overnight.


It sure is pretty for now, like flowering candy corn! (One of the dyckias took a hit this winter, and I’m waiting to see if it’ll recover.)


Clambering along the back fence, ‘Tangerine Beauty’ crossvine (Bignonia capreolata ‘Tangerine Beauty’) is my showiest plant right now, with tubular, open-throated flowers seeming to sing a chorus of welcome to spring.


Delicately parachuting from slender stems along a shadier section of the fence is white potato vine (Solanum jasminoides).


They look so pretty backlit by the sun.


I can rarely bring myself to cut my (very few) flowers from the garden, so I’ve been buying bouquets at the grocery store. I’m enjoying this flowery time of year both outdoors and in.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts — performances in private homes, which support musicians and give a small audience an up-close and personal musical experience — I’m hosting a series of garden talks by design speakers out of my home. The upcoming talk with James deGrey David has sold out, but join the Garden Spark email list for speaker announcements delivered to your inbox; simply click this link and ask to be added. Subscribers get advance notification when tickets go on sale for these limited-attendance events.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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