Just saying “Aloe!” and mullein around


Aloe there! (Anyone else into horticultural puns? Add yours in the comments, and show us aloe you can go.) I spotted this row of speckled soap aloes still blooming at Lady Bird Lake last weekend. Their coral-red candelabra blooms look especially pretty against a lime-green rebar fence.


I also enjoyed the view of Lady Bird Lake and the Lamar Bridge from the Pfluger pedestrian bridge. Someone is taking good care of a planter box on the bridge.


Back at home, I’ve been mullin’ where to add a few more mullein plants since my friend Tait Moring gave me some seeds this fall. This mullein is still blooming post-snow.


The little succulent planter is still doing fine too. With good drainage, Coahuila lace cactus and ghost plant can take our Central Texas winters in stride. The smaller sedum in the middle does well too.


Mullein sunshine. An Instagram reader recently advised that mullein is terribly invasive in drier regions like West Texas and beyond. I haven’t found it to be so in my own garden, although it does seed itself around like native Mexican feathergrass and inland sea oats. At any rate, it’s always smart to check your region’s invasive species list or ask a knowledgeable plant person before introducing a new plant into your garden.


I leave you with a menagerie of succulent planters I spotted at Blue Genie Art Bazaar. An Instagram reader saw this on my IG (@pamdigging) and expressed horror that anyone would kill a sea turtle and make a planter out of it. Hee hee — well, they DO look pretty real. But no, these are plastic animals that someone has been rather creative with.


They’re turtley fun! What a great way to add a little pandamonium (see what I did there?) to your windowsill garden this year.

All you pun-lovers, there are some amazing aloe and horticultural pun gifts on Etsy. Check ’em out.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Calling all garden bloggers! You’re invited to register for the annual Garden Bloggers Fling tour and meetup, which will be held in Austin next May 3-6, 2018! Click this link for information about registering, and you can see our itinerary here. Space is limited, so don’t delay. The 2018 Fling will be the event’s 10th anniversary, which started in Austin in 2008.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Botanical art at Stutsman garden, plus Dallas/Fort Worth nurseries


I road-tripped up to Dallas/Fort Worth last weekend with a friend for two days of garden visiting and nursery shopping. The Garden Conservancy was hosting an Open Days tour in Fort Worth on Sunday, and my favorite garden turned out to be that of metal artist Wanda Stutsman. I don’t think she made the pieces pictured above, but they make a charming focal point on her garden shed.


Wanda’s specialty is forging botanical creations out of metal, like this light pillar with cut-outs of Japanese maple leaves. It’s beautiful in the daytime and even more so at night, as seen on Wanda’s website Fern Valley Art. She also makes lights with oak and palm leaves.


Displayed throughout her garden, her metalwork adds personality and humor — like the windmill blades in this framed picture, subbing for the sun — to her patio spaces and garden beds.


Her biggest piece was this wide gate at the top of her rural property, with coneflowers, daylilies, canna leaves, and a birdbath represented larger than life.


This gate really announces that a gardener lives here, doesn’t it?


We also visited both Redenta’s Garden nurseries, one in Arlington and the other in Dallas. At the Arlington Redenta’s a patch of frostweed (Verbesina virginica) was attracting dozens of pollinators, like this monarch.


Fueling up for the journey to Mexico.


I’d never seen a great black wasp before — at first I wondered if it was a tarantula hawk — but one of the employees ID’d it for me. It was very large but not scary, intent as it was on those flowers.


At the Dallas Redenta’s, which is smaller and more urban, I admired this lovely arrangement of round pots — one with a pineapple! — and Fermob planting boxes by the entrance.


I spotted this painted pumpkin display at Nicholson-Hardie Nursery in Dallas. But oh my, where I emptied my wallet was at their Garden Center just down the street from the nursery. Much more than a garden center, it’s a home goods and gift shop with a botanical theme. Don’t miss it if you’re in the area.

By the way, today is the San Antonio Open Days tour, organized by my friend Shirley Fox. I’m eager to see the gardens, and I promise you’ll love Linda Peterson’s garden, which I’ve blogged about here and here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get ready for fall garden tours in Texas! The Garden Conservancy is sponsoring Open Days tours in San Antonio on Oct. 14th and Austin on Nov. 4th.

Join the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks! Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by inspiring designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Oxblood lilies trumpet summer’s end


Whoo-hoo, we made it through another summer here in Texas! For almost a week, lower temperatures (80s and low 90s) with even lower humidity, combined with recent rains, have rejuvenated my gardening spirit. The plants are feeling it too, perking up and starting to bloom again. But my hands-down favorite of the fall harbingers (although beautyberry runs a close second) is the trumpet-blast of deep-red oxblood lily (Rhodophiala bifida).


Forgotten all summer, these Argentine bulbs spring out of dormancy with the first good rain in late summer. Hooray!, they seem to shout. Fall is coming!


I think they look especially great with ‘Bright Edge’ yucca, whose moonshine-yellow stripes pick up the yellow of the lilies’ stamens.


Texas native chile pequin (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum) makes a good partner too as its red peppers ripen in late summer.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get ready for fall garden tours in Texas! The Garden Conservancy is sponsoring Open Days tours in Fort Worth on Oct. 8th, San Antonio on Oct. 14th, and Austin on Nov. 4th.

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by talented designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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