Log slices, twig spheres, and other natural art in garden of Debbie Friedman: Capital Region Garden Bloggers Fling


Though she lives and gardens in Maryland, Bethesda designer Debbie Friedman told us that she uses log slices, granite stones, and other natural accents to evoke the spirit of Mount Desert Island, Maine, where she enjoys vacationing. I visited her suburban garden during the recent Capital Region Garden Bloggers Fling, where a scrim of Verbena bonariensis rises from a shaggy carpet of grasses to color a welcoming stone patio accented with a wooden-slab bench and bird’s-nest-style side table.


A wider view shows how Debbie lines her front walk with ornamental grasses for a textural, naturalistic approach to her house, with the wooden bench and copper Craftsman lantern as a focal point.


There’s nothing fussy or formal about this entry garden, just meadowy charm.


A bouquet of giant black-eyed Susans decorated the porch steps.


The front walk is paved with flagstone accented with flat, round beach pebbles.


Heading around to the back garden, you pass through an inviting picket fence, with interesting columnar sweetgum trees on either side of the gate…


…and a pretty combo of hydrangea, caladium, and other shade lovers.


A paved area at the gate threshold reveals itself to be made of sliced wood rounds — a hint of things to come.


As you enter the back yard, a green lawn framed by deep shrub beds opens before you. Like giant acorns on the lawn, a trio of large twig-and-metal spheres makes a natural sculptural accent. I love these.


In a shady nook, two airy red chairs nestle among white-flowering hydrangeas.


But what stole the scene, for me, was this: a deep-shade area in an expansive back corner, which might easily have been neglected or ignored, but which Debbie has turned into a unique space for exploration and relaxation.


Sliced log rounds make a fun path through block-planted grasses, ferns, and other shade-loving groundcovers.


Laid on edge among the plants, hollow log rounds become surprisingly effective garden art.


The log-round path curves around to a hammock strung between two trees, with a swooping bamboo-pole “fence” defining the hammock patio, which is paved with more log slices.


From shade to sun — a sunny deck and stone patio provide garden access and hangout space at the back of the house.


Bedheaded bee balm adds hot color near a contemporary fountain.


Rustic-modern style is created with a contemporary Adirondack loveseat (Loll maybe?), galvanized deck skirting, and an edging of massed grasses.


A purple clematis is trained up the galvanized skirting.


The sun-washed deck features a wood-block side table, pretty succulent dish, and orange-and-turquoise elephant-motif pillow (love).


On a dining table, tillandsias and succulents are tucked into what looks like a cluster of seedpods. (If any other bloggers learned exactly what this is, I’d like to know.)


What a charming space from which to enjoy the rest of the garden.

Up next: The whimsical woodland garden of Ellen Ash. For a look back at Jeff Minnich’s Southern Gothic-infused garden, click here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by talented designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Southern Gothic garden of Jeff Minnich: Capital Region Garden Bloggers Fling


I didn’t expect to see a banana tree and sago palm in any of the gardens we visited during the Capital Region Garden Bloggers Fling last month, but Arlington, Virginia, designer Jeff Minnich‘s garden is full of surprises.


Reminiscent of a New Orleans cottage garden with picket fencing and tropical-looking potted plants out front, and with black-humor garden art in back, the garden evokes a Southern Gothic vibe more common in the Deep South than in the Upper South/Mid-Atlantic region of Washington, D.C.


A potted banana makes a broad-leaved focal point in the tiny front garden.


Angel wing begonia brightens the shade in a grapevine-adorned terracotta pot.


Rounding the corner of the house into the side yard, you see two things: 1) that Jeff has made the most of his small front garden by continuing it into a fully landscaped side yard with a major water feature, and 2) that his lot drops dramatically from the back of the house. This pretty stream, which spills into small pools, turns into a waterfall just a few feet farther along.


Tucked in a patch of prostrate yew and sedge, a golden-eyed frog watches you pass by.


From a small patio at the back corner of the house, you enjoy a view of the waterfall, overhung with a lacy Japanese maple.


And then the garden falls away from the house into a wooded canyon — or so we’d call it in Texas — lushly planted with ferns, hostas, hydrangeas, Japanese maples, and other shade lovers.


Great old trees rise above the understory along this lower path.


White-flowering hydrangea brightens the dimly lit garden.


Climbing back up to the house, you reach a narrow back patio and a handy outdoor shower.


Jeff has a slightly macabre sense of humor, as evidenced by his garden art, like this statuary fountain of a headless woman cradling her own head. This got a lot of attention from the bloggers!


As did this — an agave whose stiff, spiky leaves were topped with tiny skulls.


I couldn’t help laughing when I saw it — and contemplating the “danger garden” aspect of growing agaves.


Potted clivia adds color and more of that subtropical New Orleans vibe.


Back out front, I was admiring an arched doorway of purple-leaved loropetalum when Karin of Southern Meadows walked through in her matching purple shirt. Of course I had to get a picture.


I also really like Jeff’s unpainted fence of staggered-height 1×1-inch cedar pickets. A small concrete urn planted with succulents tops this mossy baluster near the street, adding one more charming element to a wonderfully charming garden.

Up next: The Maine-evoking garden of Maryland designer Debbie Friedman. For a look back at Peg Bier’s woodland garden of discovery, click here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by talented designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Long views and classic garden rooms in Brinitzer Garden: Capital Region Garden Bloggers Fling


Much as I love my contemporary-naturalistic garden, and enjoyed puttering in my flowery cottage garden before that, my next garden — whenever and wherever that turns out to be — is going to be more like this one: smaller, with formal garden rooms laid out along axis views, and planted mainly with evergreens for less seasonal maintenance.

This beautiful and classic garden belongs to Arlington, Virginia designer Scott Brinitzer, and we saw it on the second day of touring during the Capital Region Garden Bloggers Fling in late June. We entered the garden via this long gravel path, drawn in by a striking focal point: a potted purple cordyline in a dusty blue pot in front of a pumpkin-colored shed door.


You can see the same pot in this photo, pulling double duty now as a focal point viewed from a spacious stone patio off the back of the house. Framed by a low hedge of clipped boxwood, feathery clumping bamboo, and panels of gray lattice fencing, the pot works like a visual magnet, drawing the eye into the next space along the L-shaped gravel path that connects various garden rooms.


I might have mirrored the lattice panels for additional privacy, but leaving them open provides more air flow, which is a plus in a Southern garden.


I love the color choices, which give a contemporary edge to the classic design. (Compare with the door’s previous incarnation in blue, as seen in Scott’s portfolio pics on his website.)


Here’s the opposite view, looking away from the shed toward a small circular patio and a pair of white Adirondacks. This pathway is a double axis, with carefully considered views that pull your eye toward focal points in each direction — an effective design technique for directing the movement of people through a garden and making the most of a small space.


The circular patio acts as a visual pause at the end of the path…


…as well as a turning point for a pathway to the driveway.


The old garage still sits at the end of what was once a long driveway. Scott told us that he kept part of the driveway up by the street and converted the rest into a water-permeable gravel path and garden, helping to cut down on water runoff from his property. Yes, that makes it a water-saving garden!


Heading back to the stone patio, wire chairs take up very little space, visually, as they cluster around a lion’s-head wall fountain.


I love how the fountain is cloaked with moisture-loving moss and softened by a clematis vine. A yellow hosta echoes the yellow-themed container planting at left…


…filled with ‘Color Guard’ yucca, variegated Solomon’s seal, and (I think) ‘Moonbeam’ coreopsis.


Lion’s-head fountain and purple clematis


Other patio pots contain caramel-colored plants, for an interesting change of pace.


New Zealand sedges, I think


Enveloped by the garden, the house is shaded by lovely trees, which Scott planted in his own and his neighbors’ yards as part of a streetwide beautification effort. A swooping wall of concrete aggregate encloses the front garden and the front porch — the creation of the home’s former owner.


Built-in urns are planted with a variety of succulents.


Scott’s dog, a cute Norwich terrier named Kobe, hung out with us as we toured the garden and enjoyed the wine and snacks the owners generously provided.


He seems pretty happy living here, doesn’t he?

Up next: My visit to the Smithsonian Gardens and U.S. Botanic Garden on the National Mall. For a look back at the pollinator-friendly Casa Mariposa garden of Fling planner Tammy Schmitt, plus a winery and garden center visit, click here.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Get on the mailing list for Garden Spark Talks. Inspired by the idea of house concerts, I’m hosting a series of garden talks by talented designers and authors out of my home. Talks are limited-attendance events and generally sell out within just a few days, so join the Garden Spark email list for early notifications. Simply click this link and ask to be added.

All material © 2006-2017 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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