Need shade? Read my article about native vines in Wildflower


It’s summer. It’s Texas. And we all know it’s only getting hotter. That’s a line from an old radio ad, but truer words were never spoken. If you need shade in order to enjoy your yard at this time of year, how about giving a native vine a try? (Southern gardeners, do wait until planting time rolls around in October.)


In the summer 2016 issue of Wildflower, the magazine of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center here in Austin, I’m writing about native vines for shade. My picks are focused on vines for the South and Southwest, but for a California perspective, I interviewed Bay Area designer and author Rebecca Sweet, who shared her favorite native vines for shade. Oh, and that’s my photo of native wisteria (Wisteria frutescens) too.

I’ll post a link when it’s available. In the meantime, consider subscribing in order to get articles and beautiful photos about native plants, plus news about the Wildflower Center and native planting efforts across North America. All you have to do is join the Wildflower Center. Your membership also gets you reciprocal membership to many botanical gardens around the country, a perk that comes in handy if you travel.


Speaking of the Wildflower Center, I dropped in for a quick visit a couple of weekends ago and enjoyed the gardens around the cafe. The grotto pond was looking terrific with a supersized Jamaican swamp sawgrass (Cladium mariscus ssp. jamaicense), a wetland sedge native to the Gulf Coast region, and a hibiscus (H. moscheutos) with flowers the size of salad plates.


Jamaican swamp sawgrass


Hibiscus moscheutos


The view from the cafe windows


And the iconic cistern tower, which stores rainwater from the roofs. An interior stair segues halfway up to an exterior stair, which leads all the way to the top for a bird’s-eye view.


Coneflower and mistflower in the meadow


Bouquets of native flowers and grasses from the garden adorn the cafe tables, offering an up-close view of these beautiful plants that connect us to the natural landscape we inhabit.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
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Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Do you review? Have you read my new book, The Water-Saving Garden? If you found it helpful or inspirational, please consider leaving a review — even just a sentence or two — on Amazon, Goodreads, or other sites. Online reviews are crucial in getting a book noticed. I really appreciate your help!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

Look for me in Garden Design and my book in Southern Living


What a treat to have two treasured magazines arrive in the mailbox, one containing an article I’ve been working on, the other with a nice mention of my new book!


In the July 2016 issue, Southern Living garden editor Steve “Grumpy Gardener” Bender recommends my book The Water-Saving Garden — yay!


Thanks, Steve!


And look for my latest article in the Summer 2016 issue of Garden Design.


It’s always a thrill to be a contributor!


My article, a profile of New York-based landscape architect Edmund Hollander and design lessons from his gardens, starts on page 130. Ed is a personable interviewee with a great sense of humor, and I think you’ll enjoy his insights.


If you don’t already subscribe to both magazines, you should. Garden Design is for anyone who appreciates in-depth writing about gardens, plants, and design plus gorgeous eye candy. For those who live in (or miss) the South, Southern Living showcases beautiful homes and gardens plus regional travel and food.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Do you review? Have you read my new book, The Water-Saving Garden? If you found it helpful or inspirational, please consider leaving a review — even just a sentence or two — on Amazon, Goodreads, or other sites. Online reviews are crucial in getting a book noticed. I really appreciate your help!

My article about Voorhes’ homestead garden in Austin Home


A homestead garden in the city? You bet! I’ll show you the productive garden of Adam Voorhes and Robin Finlay — a commercial- and editorial-photography team (and married couple) known as The Voorhes — in the Summer 2016 issue of Austin Home, which you can find on area newsstands now.


I wrote and photographed the article, which is a first for me. I had the pleasure of interviewing Robin and Adam last fall. Their garden designer, B. Jane, whose work I love, and their bulldogs, Lefty and Lucy, made it into the shoot too. Well, Lefty did. He’s the more social one.


Adam and Robin’s garden is all about, What can it do for me? They have a large winter-vegetable garden, citrus trees and loquats for fruit, a pecan tree for nuts, a beehive for honey, chickens for eggs, cisterns for water collection, and a clothesline for energy-efficient drying. Even their custom, trough-style water feature is more than merely decorative: it provides water for their bees. They also grow herbs for cooking and pollinator plants for the bees.


B. Jane packed a lot into their smallish lot, but it doesn’t feel overcrowded thanks to the openness of a small lawn in the shade of the pecan and a generous, straight-edge path that defines the lawn and provides access to the working areas.

Check it out, if you can get your hands on a copy. There are several other garden articles in this issue as well. Update 6/16: You can read the article online too.


Also in this issue, editor Gene Menez interviewed me for a nice mention of my book on page 44, which I appreciate. I got a kick out of the title, “Penick’s Little Green Book,” which you golfing enthusiasts may recognize as playing off Harvey Penick’s Little Red Book. At least once a month someone will ask me if I’m related to Harvey Penick, a legendary and beloved golf instructor from Texas. (The answer is no, but my husband is, distantly.)


I leave you with one last image from the Voorhes’ garden: their dog Lefty and his ball, and their easygoing patio ready for summer relaxation.

I welcome your comments; please scroll to the end of this post to leave one. If you’re reading this in a subscription email, click here to visit Digging and find the comment box at the end of each post.
_______________________

Digging Deeper: News and Upcoming Events

Do you review? Have you read my new book, The Water-Saving Garden? If you found it helpful or inspirational, please consider leaving a review — even just a sentence or two — on Amazon, Goodreads, or other sites. Online reviews are crucial in getting a book noticed. I really appreciate your help!

All material © 2006-2016 by Pam Penick for Digging. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

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